Courtesy of Melissa Rachel Black

Melissa Rachel Black is the artist behind these sweet takes on Van Gogh, Seurat, Munch and more.

August 09, 2017

"Some say they see poetry in my painting. I see only science," the painter Georges-Pierre Seurat once wrote. You may notice that he didn't say "I see only science and gummy bears." But, while this gummy bear-ed out recreation of A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte may not be better than the original from an artistic standpoint, it's almost certainly more delicious.

Courtesy of Melissa Rachel Black

Melissa Rachel Black, an illustrator currently living in Portland, Oregon, has used over 100,000 gummy bears to pay tribute to a variety of famous images. From famous works of art to faces of celebrities to the American flag, Black has gummy-fied it all. The famous paintings that Black has recreated include The Scream by Edvard Munch, Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh, and, of course, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges-Pierre Seurat. She's also gummy-fied the faces of Barack Obama and Lady Gaga. (The portraits go from delightful to terrifying when she melts their faces into a dripping gummy mess.)

Courtesy of Melissa Rachel Black

Why gummy bears? Black says, "Humor, curiosity and childlike exploration play crucial roles in my work.... Children and adults alike connect with the simple joy of realizing my creations are made out of real gummy bears." Sure enough, there's something super delightful about seeing some of history's greatest paintings and most iconic images recreated in tiny, loveable candies. We're pretty sure Betsy Ross would be into this gummy flag, but we're not as convinced that Van Gogh would be down with his masterpiece getting a candy makeover.

Courtesy of Melissa Rachel Black

You can buy some of Melissa Rachel Black's gummy creations here, at her Etsy shop. Plus, if you like seeing famous paintings recreated in food, you might enjoy these hot dog-ful takes on historic masterpieces, these latte-fied paintings, or these rice recreations of Rothko.