Courtesy of Jeremy Sewall

After opening French-inspired Les Sablons in Boston this past spring, chef Jeremy Sewall goes straight to the source. Here’s his guide to Paris.

Elyse Inamine
January 18, 2018

Jeremy Sewall, the chef behind Row 34 and Island Creek Oyster Bar in Boston, was supposed to go to Paris this past April. Instead, he opened Les Sablons, his modern French restaurant with lines out the door.

Sewall and his wife Lisa, formerly a pastry chef at L’Espalier, finally found time to hit up the City of Lights late last year, and here’s where they ate, drank and soaked in more inspiration for Les Sablons.

Courtesy of Jeremy Sewall

L’Avant Comptoir de la Mer

“Located in the 6th arrondissement, this was one of my favorite dining experiences of the trip. (I love eating small plates of seafood!) It’s standing room only here, but you won’t notice after sharing and passing lobster in corn pudding and having a great time. My friend Dorie Greenspan joined us, and she’s such an inspiration, which made for one magical night."

Le Bon Marché

“Shopping at this gorgeous, multi-level department store in the 7th arrondissement is a trip. Each floor has something different: amazing selections of books, children’s clothing, bespoke outfits for men and women. However, needless to say, we were salivating by the time we hit the market on the ground floor. It’s sort of like the French version of Eataly. We ended up with a handful of cheeses that we unwrapped in our hotel and ate in our pajamas. It was pretty great.”

Courtesy of Jeremy Sewall

Clamato

“This seafood spot in the 11th arrondissement is a must visit. Own and operated by the people behind Septime, it has a chill Brooklyn vibe and incredibly knowledgeable staff. My favorite dishes were the smoked haddock with wild mushrooms and the sabayon and maple syrup tart to finish.”

Frenchie To Go

“While exploring the side streets in the 2nd arrondissement, we stumbled upon this tiny French café next to a small produce market and fishmonger. Chef Gregory Marchand sources the majority of his ingredients from these neighbors. We sat at a small table, feasting on veal tongue sandwiches and fish and chips while drinking rosé. It was basically perfect.”

Courtesy of Jeremy Sewall

Patrick Roger Chocolatier

“This small collection of chocolate shops was high on my wife Lisa’s list of places to check out. Stepping into one of the stores is like visiting a high-end jewelry boutique. An attendant helps you pick your chocolate gems out of a locked glass case. The team at Patrick Roger are truly artists, though. They sculpt things out of chocolate that I didn’t think possible and really push you to think outside of the box of what can be done with the confection. For example, there was a prehistoric-looking skull in the window that was bizarre, interesting and made entirely out of chocolate!”

Pierre Hermé

“This is the world’s best patisserie—and maker of classic macarons. (Thankfully, there are multiple boutiques in Paris, and throughout the world.) I know I’m making a controversial statement here—many people feel that it should be Ladurée. We went to see what the fuss was all about, but we were quickly won over by this charming, classic, old-school spot.”