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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Luscious Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

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Early Summer Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

© Stephanie Meyer

I don’t know about you, but right now, I have way too many farmers’ market strawberries and rhubarb in my freezer and I need to make way for the fruits coming into season this week. Spring and summer came early in Minnesota this year, and the rhubarb was amazing—sweet and long, tart and red.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

How to Explode the Myth That Cheese Can't Go With Fish

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Broiled Salmon with Blue Cheese, Lemon and Dill

© Stephanie Meyer

My buddy Karl Benson has cooked this recipe for 15 years, but it took me 10 years to even taste it. Once I did, I was sold. I hope you don’t wait as long as I did to found out how stubborn and how wrong you can be. I think he got this recipe from his Swedish family, or from cooking one night at home with his friend Marcus Samuelsson, the famous chef, and experimenting a little bit.

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Chefs

What You Need to Know About Rene Redzepi Mad Food Camp

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Noma's Rene Redzepi is About to Host his 2nd Annual MAD Food Camp.

It's food festival time!! Well, it's always food festival time these days; but some big hitters are coming up, so take note. Next week it's the 30th Anniversary of Food & Wine Classic in Aspen. And just a few weeks later, over in Copenhagen, comes MAD2 from René Redzepi of Noma; it's his second now-annual MAD Food Symposium, aka Food Camp. Plate online said it really well: Redzepi can do pretty much anything he wants these days. He can appear on the cover of Time magazine, he can tweet out moose head photos as potential dinner ingredients. And he can host the MAD Symposium and have it quickly becomes the gold standard of chefs conferences.

If you missed the first MAD Food Camp—and you're in the food world—take note of the festival, taking place July 1 - 2. Some of the A-list chefs who have already RSVP’d yes for MAD2: Ferran Adrià, St. John’s Fergus Henderson, Mission Street Chinese’s Danny Bowein, WD50’s Wylie Dufresne, Pujol’s Enrique Olvera. Here’s what René has to say: “There will be a great collection of people; it's going to be an exciting couple of days. We already have a few new surprises in store for those coming!” Here’s what Momofuku's Dave Chang, who may or may not somehow make an appearance has to say: “At Mad festival you don’t know what’s going to happen. Last year, there was a family meal. René had Michel Bras making vegetables, Magnus Nilsson cooking oysters, Ben Shewry preparing an egg dish. And the food critics were the sous chefs. It was an extraordinary spread.”

For more details, go to: www.madfood.co

Date: July 1 – 2, 2012
Location: Refshaleøen, Copenhagen
Theme: Appetite
Ticket price: Approximately $350 (includes entry on two days plus breakfast, lunch and drinks on both)
How to purchase the few tickets that are left: contact Ali Kurshat Altinsoy at aka@noma.dk

Related: World's 10 Life-Changing Restaurants

The Creative Lives of Chefs René Redzepi and Daniel Patterson

Dave Chang

Restaurants

Andrew Zimmern's Grilling Favorite

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Bizarre Foods host and F&W contributing editor Andrew Zimmern discovered mind-blowing Filipino chicken near San Diego.

Andrew Zimmern

© Ethan Hill

National City, CA: Tita’s Kitchenette

“Food from the Philippines has not caught on in the US with the same fervor as other South Asian cuisines. But it’s starting to, thanks to large expat communities in towns like National City, just outside San Diego. It’s home to Tita’s Kitchenette, a point-and-order cafeteria owned by the same family for 20-plus years. At any one time there are two dozen dishes available. You meander down the line, tray in hand. Remember back in grade school? Here, the lunch ladies are Filipino grandmas, and everything they cook is exquisite—the sweet potato-shrimp fritters are as good as any I have ever tasted outside of the Philippines. But the grilled meats are the best. Golf ball-size nubbins of chicken and pork are marinated in a soy-lemon-pineapple bath, then grilled in small batches so that nothing sits for longer than a few minutes. They’re ethereal: treacly and tart, tangy and smoky. Tita’s opens at 6 a.m., and lunch is available early for people who need to grab something on their way to work.” 2720 E. Plaza Blvd. Ste. E; 619-472-5801.

Check Out F&W's Exlusive Series: Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Travel

New Toronto Restaurants

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New York City’s top chefs are setting their sights on Toronto, opening outposts of their popular restaurants in three of the city’s hottest new hotels.—Amy Rosen

Scott Conant

Courtesy of Becca PR

Daniel Boulud: Yorkville
Daniel Boulud exports his signature French flavors to Café Boulud at the Four Seasons.

David Chang: Financial District
The Momofuku chef’s newest restaurants will open at the Shangri-La, which debuts in August.

Scott Conant: King West (photo)
At his Scarpetta offshoot at the Thompson, Scott Conant offers great pastas and salads.

Related: More Travel Content

Travel

The Next Noma

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Critics weigh in on which restaurant will join the famed Danish spot, and reigning number one restaurant in the world, Noma, on the pilgrimage circuit.

Benu, San Francisco

© Justin Lewis

Benu, San Francisco (left)
The San Francisco Chronicle’s Michael Bauer praises Corey Lee’s breathtaking East meets West modernist cuisine (Lee makes a mock shark’s-fin soup using thin strands of hydrocolloids).

Attica, Australia
Melbourne’s Ben Shewry serves “emo” cuisine, built on personal memories and foraged foods. “It’s the best expression of Oz’s terroir,” says The Age’s Matt Preston.

Aponiente, Spain
Ángel León’s umami-packed risotto with plankton makes him “the René Redzepi of the sea,” says F&W correspondent Gisela Williams.

 

Noma, Denmark

© Ditte Isager

Fäviken Magasinet, Sweden
A modern primitive dining experience—aged meats hanging in the dining room, fried lichen on the plate. Time’s Lisa Abend calls Magnus Nilsson’s food “intensely perfect.”

Noma, Denmark (left)
“Noma’s the next Noma, isn’t it?” says the L.A. Times’s Jonathan Gold. “Redzepi is writing symphonies while everyone else is playing chopsticks.”

 

 

Read more from the May issue.

Travel

How Hotels Get Personal

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It takes more than grand gestures to impress hotel dweller Paul Carr.

Hotels Get Personal

© Klas Fahlén

A knock on one’s hotel-room door at 10 p.m. rarely bodes well. Unless, that is, one is staying at a particular five-star hotel in Las Vegas, in which case it heralds a man struggling under the weight of a gigantic chocolate garden, with flowers, trees and shrubs—an over-the-top take on the pillow mint. As a person who lives in hotels, I’ve watched the arms race of room service with interest. The latest trend is über-personalization, in which hotels provide extras tailored to each guest. As an example: I recently spent a night at The Lanesborough in London, failing to stump my butler with a spiraling list of requests. Could the chef prepare a deep-fried quail? Of course. How about a partridge wrap with a diamond cocktail stick? For a price. I opted for a chicken sandwich. It arrived alongside a small chocolate cake, the words Happy 30th Birthday iced on the top with a single lit candle. I hadn’t told anyone it was my birthday. Creating a chocolate garden is no doubt impressive, but far harder is delivering a personal touch without fanfare. No diamond cocktail stick required.

Paul Carr chronicles his hotel adventures in his book The Upgrade.

Read more travel stories from our May issue.

Travel

Curated Picnic Baskets

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For National Picnic Day on Monday: a chef-curated basket for a cause.

Curated Picnic Baskets

© Antonis Achilleos

Central Park picnics just got fancier: Alice Waters is now customizing baskets for Mandarin Oriental NY guests. She selected the assortment at left; a portion of the proceeds supports her Edible Schoolyard program. mandarinoriental.com.

In Alice Waters’s Picnic Basket:
- Local Artisan Salumi
- Eco-Chic Bamboo Cutlery
- French Radishes
- Rustic Pizza Bianca
- Thyme-Grilled Quail

Travel

L.A.'s Best Sushi

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N Naka Sushi

© Zen Sekizawa

Tony Maws of Craigie on Main, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was last in L.A. as a kid. Now he wants to go back and eat sushi and sashimi around the city. See his picks >

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Wine

Virtual Vine Tours

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The April issue spotlights tech toys for foodies. Here's a fantastic site for wine lovers.

Virtual Vine Tours

© Frederick Wildman and Sons, Ltd

 

Using Google Earth technology, wine importer Frederick Wildman and Sons offers 3-D interactive tours on its website, tour.frederickwildman.com, stopping at iconic regions around the world (like Puligny-Montrachet, above). Some include commentary from winemakers like Rioja’s Baron de Ley.

 

Related: High-Tech Hotels

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Run with chefs and wine experts in the Celebrity Chef 5K and dance all night at Gail Simmons’ Last Bite Dessert Party during the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.