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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Cool Cucumber Soup with Yogurt, Dill and a Side of History

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Cold Cucumber Soup with Yogurt and Dill

© Stephanie Meyer

In the Zimmern house, when the weather turns steamy in Minneapolis, we always keep a glass pitcher of cold soup in the fridge. We alternate between my gazpacho recipe and this cucumber yogurt soup of Turkish origin. While everyone thinks of cukes as an American farmhouse staple, Turkey is the third-largest producer of cukes in the world.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Grilled Peanut-Lime Cornish Hens, Penang-Style

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Grilled Peanut-Lime Cornish Hens, Penang-Style

© Stephanie Meyer

In the early days of my travel life, I fell in love with Malay food and with the island of Penang. Pound for pound, this little island may have some of the best food in the world. On Kimberley Street or New Lane in the central city of Georgetown, the hawker stalls come alive at night and they serve some of the best chow in town.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

How to Make Grilled Beef Rolls Like a Vietnamese Grandmother

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Grilled Beef Rolls with Nuoc Cham Dipping Sauce

© Stephanie Meyer

Bo la lot is one of my favorite Vietnamese foods and a global fan favorite as well. Whether you use wild betel leaves, grape leaves (which I think work equally well) or even chard or kale, the authenticity meter won’t redline. This is one of those treats that you can truly make your own way, just like every Vietnamese grandmother does.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Memories of South Fork and Cioppino with Mussels

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Cioppino with Mussels

© Stephanie Meyer

As a young boy growing up in New York City, we would spend our summers on the South Fork of Long Island. My dad would take me down to the beach at low tide, we would walk a mile down to the jetties and he would lower me by my ankles into the crevices between the massive boulders to grab at huge ropes of mussels. We would crab on Georgica pond for fun, pull clams out of Gardiners Bay, fish for porgies and snappers and make up any deficits for our Saturday dinners at the local seafood store. I thought we were foraging, but now that I am a dad, I realize this was my pop’s way of staying sane on rainy days with a seven-year-old to look after. We would haul our treasure home and my mother would make a superb summer fish stew out of whatever we brought in the door. My mom was as brilliant a cook as my dad is. She passed away a few months ago, and I am recooking my way through her recipe bin. My mother went to college at Mills, in San Francisco, and she roomed with Trader Vic Bergeron’s daughter. Vic taught them to cook late at night in the kitchen of the original outpost of the international Polynesian restaurant concept that still bears his name. Vic loved to eat, according to my mom, and while pupu platters were more his thing when it came to selling food, he loved the cuisine of northern California and made sure my mom knew how to make a simple cioppino before she graduated.

This easy and simple tomato-and-wine-spiked seafood stew is a Bay Area staple. Cioppino was supposedly created in the late 19th century by Portuguese and Italian fishermen who settled in the region from Genoa, Italy. Like all these types of dishes, it was first made on the boats while the men were out at sea and then found its way into the Italian restaurants that exploded on the scene in San Francisco. The name comes from ciuppin, a Ligurian word meaning “to chop” or “chopped,” which described a fisherman’s chore of chopping up scraps and bits of the day’s catch that weren’t sellable.

This recipe has been in my family since the early ’50s in one way or another and I love it. Serve it with plenty of toasts made from sourdough boule and a large, bracing green salad.

Go to Recipe: Cioppino with Mussels

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Luscious Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

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Early Summer Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

© Stephanie Meyer

I don’t know about you, but right now, I have way too many farmers’ market strawberries and rhubarb in my freezer and I need to make way for the fruits coming into season this week. Spring and summer came early in Minnesota this year, and the rhubarb was amazing—sweet and long, tart and red.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

How to Explode the Myth That Cheese Can't Go With Fish

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Broiled Salmon with Blue Cheese, Lemon and Dill

© Stephanie Meyer

My buddy Karl Benson has cooked this recipe for 15 years, but it took me 10 years to even taste it. Once I did, I was sold. I hope you don’t wait as long as I did to found out how stubborn and how wrong you can be. I think he got this recipe from his Swedish family, or from cooking one night at home with his friend Marcus Samuelsson, the famous chef, and experimenting a little bit.

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Chefs

What You Need to Know About Rene Redzepi Mad Food Camp

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Noma's Rene Redzepi is About to Host his 2nd Annual MAD Food Camp.

It's food festival time!! Well, it's always food festival time these days; but some big hitters are coming up, so take note. Next week it's the 30th Anniversary of Food & Wine Classic in Aspen. And just a few weeks later, over in Copenhagen, comes MAD2 from René Redzepi of Noma; it's his second now-annual MAD Food Symposium, aka Food Camp. Plate online said it really well: Redzepi can do pretty much anything he wants these days. He can appear on the cover of Time magazine, he can tweet out moose head photos as potential dinner ingredients. And he can host the MAD Symposium and have it quickly becomes the gold standard of chefs conferences.

If you missed the first MAD Food Camp—and you're in the food world—take note of the festival, taking place July 1 - 2. Some of the A-list chefs who have already RSVP’d yes for MAD2: Ferran Adrià, St. John’s Fergus Henderson, Mission Street Chinese’s Danny Bowein, WD50’s Wylie Dufresne, Pujol’s Enrique Olvera. Here’s what René has to say: “There will be a great collection of people; it's going to be an exciting couple of days. We already have a few new surprises in store for those coming!” Here’s what Momofuku's Dave Chang, who may or may not somehow make an appearance has to say: “At Mad festival you don’t know what’s going to happen. Last year, there was a family meal. René had Michel Bras making vegetables, Magnus Nilsson cooking oysters, Ben Shewry preparing an egg dish. And the food critics were the sous chefs. It was an extraordinary spread.”

For more details, go to: www.madfood.co

Date: July 1 – 2, 2012
Location: Refshaleøen, Copenhagen
Theme: Appetite
Ticket price: Approximately $350 (includes entry on two days plus breakfast, lunch and drinks on both)
How to purchase the few tickets that are left: contact Ali Kurshat Altinsoy at aka@noma.dk

Related: World's 10 Life-Changing Restaurants

The Creative Lives of Chefs René Redzepi and Daniel Patterson

Dave Chang

Restaurants

Andrew Zimmern's Grilling Favorite

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Bizarre Foods host and F&W contributing editor Andrew Zimmern discovered mind-blowing Filipino chicken near San Diego.

Andrew Zimmern

© Ethan Hill

National City, CA: Tita’s Kitchenette

“Food from the Philippines has not caught on in the US with the same fervor as other South Asian cuisines. But it’s starting to, thanks to large expat communities in towns like National City, just outside San Diego. It’s home to Tita’s Kitchenette, a point-and-order cafeteria owned by the same family for 20-plus years. At any one time there are two dozen dishes available. You meander down the line, tray in hand. Remember back in grade school? Here, the lunch ladies are Filipino grandmas, and everything they cook is exquisite—the sweet potato-shrimp fritters are as good as any I have ever tasted outside of the Philippines. But the grilled meats are the best. Golf ball-size nubbins of chicken and pork are marinated in a soy-lemon-pineapple bath, then grilled in small batches so that nothing sits for longer than a few minutes. They’re ethereal: treacly and tart, tangy and smoky. Tita’s opens at 6 a.m., and lunch is available early for people who need to grab something on their way to work.” 2720 E. Plaza Blvd. Ste. E; 619-472-5801.

Check Out F&W's Exlusive Series: Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Travel

New Toronto Restaurants

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New York City’s top chefs are setting their sights on Toronto, opening outposts of their popular restaurants in three of the city’s hottest new hotels.—Amy Rosen

Scott Conant

Courtesy of Becca PR

Daniel Boulud: Yorkville
Daniel Boulud exports his signature French flavors to Café Boulud at the Four Seasons.

David Chang: Financial District
The Momofuku chef’s newest restaurants will open at the Shangri-La, which debuts in August.

Scott Conant: King West (photo)
At his Scarpetta offshoot at the Thompson, Scott Conant offers great pastas and salads.

Related: More Travel Content

Travel

The Next Noma

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Critics weigh in on which restaurant will join the famed Danish spot, and reigning number one restaurant in the world, Noma, on the pilgrimage circuit.

Benu, San Francisco

© Justin Lewis

Benu, San Francisco (left)
The San Francisco Chronicle’s Michael Bauer praises Corey Lee’s breathtaking East meets West modernist cuisine (Lee makes a mock shark’s-fin soup using thin strands of hydrocolloids).

Attica, Australia
Melbourne’s Ben Shewry serves “emo” cuisine, built on personal memories and foraged foods. “It’s the best expression of Oz’s terroir,” says The Age’s Matt Preston.

Aponiente, Spain
Ángel León’s umami-packed risotto with plankton makes him “the René Redzepi of the sea,” says F&W correspondent Gisela Williams.

 

Noma, Denmark

© Ditte Isager

Fäviken Magasinet, Sweden
A modern primitive dining experience—aged meats hanging in the dining room, fried lichen on the plate. Time’s Lisa Abend calls Magnus Nilsson’s food “intensely perfect.”

Noma, Denmark (left)
“Noma’s the next Noma, isn’t it?” says the L.A. Times’s Jonathan Gold. “Redzepi is writing symphonies while everyone else is playing chopsticks.”

 

 

Read more from the May issue.

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.