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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

The Queen of Sicilian Cuisine's Brilliant Rabbit

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Grilled Wine-Braised Rabbit with Chimichurri

© Stephanie Meyer

In Sicily in fall 2009, I had a chance to eat, hang out and get some private instruction from the queen of Sicilian cuisine, Eleonora Consoli. She is a force of nature and a champion of Sicilian melting pot cuisine. Her stunning villa in the shadow of Mount Etna is filled with lemon trees, herb pots, a collection of copper dessert molds, cassata forms (pans) and the types of photos in silver frames that are jaw dropping (El, is that you with Onassis and Jackie?). She is a feisty and strong-minded lady and things are done her way in her kitchen. Read more >

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Trendspotting

3 Far-Flung Escapes in Southeast Asia

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Song Saa Private Island, Cambodia

© Song Saa Private Island

Here, three destinations for a spectacular fall or winter vacation.

The Naka Island, a Luxury Collection Resort, Thailand
Thailand’s most famous island, Phuket, is gorgeous but a bit overdeveloped. This secluded 67-villa resort is just a 25-minute boat ride away. From $470 per night; nakaislandphuket.com.

Vedana Lagoon, Vietnam
On a remote lagoon between Hue and Hoi An in the central part of the country, this luxurious eco-resort is all about the spa, with many of the herbs for treatments sourced from its on-site garden. From $340 per night; vedanalagoon.com.

Song Saa Private Island, Cambodia (photo)
After being captivated by the beauty of Cambodia, an Australian couple created this incredible private-island resort. From $1,336 per night, meals included; songsaa.com.

Related: New Ingredients for a Southeast Asian Pantry

Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Spaghettini with Arugula, Pancetta, Herbs and Eggs

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Spaghettini with Arugula, Pancetta, Herbs and Eggs

© Stephanie Meyer

There is no better midnight dinner than this one. Period. End of discussion.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Irresistible Skewered Shrimp and Ham with Apple Jelly

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Skewered Shrimp and Ham with Apple Jelly

© Stephanie Meyer

Twenty-four years ago I had a meal at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, and met the chef, Jamie Shannon. He was an amazing chef and a brilliant talent. Despite his New Jersey origins, he reinvented himself as a son of the South. His Commander’s Palace cookbook is one of my favorites. Read more >

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Travel

The New Machine Age

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Hotel Indigo in Atlanta

© Carlos Garcia

Guests can help themselves to a snack, a glass of wine or cocktail fixings from foodie vending machines and minibars in hotel lobbies.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Cool Cucumber Soup with Yogurt, Dill and a Side of History

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Cold Cucumber Soup with Yogurt and Dill

© Stephanie Meyer

In the Zimmern house, when the weather turns steamy in Minneapolis, we always keep a glass pitcher of cold soup in the fridge. We alternate between my gazpacho recipe and this cucumber yogurt soup of Turkish origin. While everyone thinks of cukes as an American farmhouse staple, Turkey is the third-largest producer of cukes in the world.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Grilled Peanut-Lime Cornish Hens, Penang-Style

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Grilled Peanut-Lime Cornish Hens, Penang-Style

© Stephanie Meyer

In the early days of my travel life, I fell in love with Malay food and with the island of Penang. Pound for pound, this little island may have some of the best food in the world. On Kimberley Street or New Lane in the central city of Georgetown, the hawker stalls come alive at night and they serve some of the best chow in town.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

How to Make Grilled Beef Rolls Like a Vietnamese Grandmother

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Grilled Beef Rolls with Nuoc Cham Dipping Sauce

© Stephanie Meyer

Bo la lot is one of my favorite Vietnamese foods and a global fan favorite as well. Whether you use wild betel leaves, grape leaves (which I think work equally well) or even chard or kale, the authenticity meter won’t redline. This is one of those treats that you can truly make your own way, just like every Vietnamese grandmother does.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Memories of South Fork and Cioppino with Mussels

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Cioppino with Mussels

© Stephanie Meyer

As a young boy growing up in New York City, we would spend our summers on the South Fork of Long Island. My dad would take me down to the beach at low tide, we would walk a mile down to the jetties and he would lower me by my ankles into the crevices between the massive boulders to grab at huge ropes of mussels. We would crab on Georgica pond for fun, pull clams out of Gardiners Bay, fish for porgies and snappers and make up any deficits for our Saturday dinners at the local seafood store. I thought we were foraging, but now that I am a dad, I realize this was my pop’s way of staying sane on rainy days with a seven-year-old to look after. We would haul our treasure home and my mother would make a superb summer fish stew out of whatever we brought in the door. My mom was as brilliant a cook as my dad is. She passed away a few months ago, and I am recooking my way through her recipe bin. My mother went to college at Mills, in San Francisco, and she roomed with Trader Vic Bergeron’s daughter. Vic taught them to cook late at night in the kitchen of the original outpost of the international Polynesian restaurant concept that still bears his name. Vic loved to eat, according to my mom, and while pupu platters were more his thing when it came to selling food, he loved the cuisine of northern California and made sure my mom knew how to make a simple cioppino before she graduated.

This easy and simple tomato-and-wine-spiked seafood stew is a Bay Area staple. Cioppino was supposedly created in the late 19th century by Portuguese and Italian fishermen who settled in the region from Genoa, Italy. Like all these types of dishes, it was first made on the boats while the men were out at sea and then found its way into the Italian restaurants that exploded on the scene in San Francisco. The name comes from ciuppin, a Ligurian word meaning “to chop” or “chopped,” which described a fisherman’s chore of chopping up scraps and bits of the day’s catch that weren’t sellable.

This recipe has been in my family since the early ’50s in one way or another and I love it. Serve it with plenty of toasts made from sourdough boule and a large, bracing green salad.

Go to Recipe: Cioppino with Mussels

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Luscious Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

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Early Summer Strawberry-Rhubarb Crumble

© Stephanie Meyer

I don’t know about you, but right now, I have way too many farmers’ market strawberries and rhubarb in my freezer and I need to make way for the fruits coming into season this week. Spring and summer came early in Minnesota this year, and the rhubarb was amazing—sweet and long, tart and red.

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Run with chefs and wine experts in the Celebrity Chef 5K and dance all night at Gail Simmons’ Last Bite Dessert Party during the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.