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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Bronson van Wyck's Take-Home Style

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Take-Home Holiday Style

Photo © John Kernick.

Here’s what you’ll find at event planner Bronson van Wyck’s seasonal pop-up shop, through January 3, inside Manhattan’s Overbey & Dunn design store (19 Christopher St.).

Southern-Style Garlands
His garlands often feature magnolia leaves—some are gilded and others are flipped over to show the brown underside, a striking contrast to the dark-green leaves.

Bespoke Garlands and Wreaths
For customers who bring measurements, van Wyck’s shop will custom-make wreaths and garlands from magnolia leaves and other stunning foliage to fit individual spaces. From $300.

Christmas Trees
You can pick out a tree, then have it fitted with lights and hand-painted in amber by van Wyck’s staff. From $1,250.

Tartan Plaids
Tablecloths and napkins, some patterned after the tartan plaid of van Wyck’s mother’s Scottish clan, can be monogrammed in the store while you wait. From $100.

Signature Dressings and Mixers
Van Wyck bottled three kinds of salad dressings (two vinaigrettes and a Caesar) and two mixers (Bloody Mary and margarita) and hired Brooklyn design firm Madwell to create the retro labels. They are available online at vanwyck.net.

Related: Editor Picks: Perfect Presents
Best Christmas Gifts
Incredible Homemade Gifts

Style Find

3 Tips for Mixing Fall Florals at Home

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Orangerie-Rose Zephirine Wallpaper

Photo courtesy of Designers Guild / Osborne & Little.

Florals for spring are nothing new, but this season fashion designers such as Dolce & Gabbana, Suno and Derek Lam unveiled them in dark, bold colors like burgundy, burnt orange, navy and magenta. To apply the look indoors, Dutch interior designer Barbara Groen recommends juxtaposing various prints as she did earlier this year for her project “Flower Power 101.” Here, Groen’s tips for creating the supermodern look at home, along with a slideshow of floral accents.

1. Focus. Pick one room or area of the house and try to stick to a certain style of patterns: big flowers or mini flowers, bright colors or soft colors.

2. Repeat colors. For example, if the pattern is pink, try to put something pink in the room, or let the same pink come back in another pattern.

3. Try wallpaper as art. You can cover a big board in a special pattern, then hang it on your wall or put it on a side table or fireplace.

SLIDESHOW: FLORAL STYLE FINDS

Related: How to Work Neon at Home
Ikat: Modern Designs for a Traditional Pattern

Style Find

Gorgeous Tea Tins

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Tea Patina

Photo courtesy of Tortoise General Store.

F&W's October issue looks at the wisdom of aging, from barrel-aged cocktails to shopping finds that age gracefully. Since 1875, Kaikado in Japan has been creating metal tea tins that are meant to subtly change color and texture over time, developing a patina. Finally, the tins are available in the US. Brass transforms within a year; tin, three to five years and copper, just two to three months. From $140; tortoisegeneralstore.com.

Style Find

Ikat: Modern Designs for a Traditional Pattern

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Ikat Bowls

Courtesy of Worldmarket.com

Ikat is an ancient weaving technique used for centuries in South America and Southeast Asia to create rugs and textiles with a graphic tie-dye effect, and the distinctive look is now a trend in clothing and home accents. Designer Susan Connor prints the pattern on notebooks and pencil cases. >

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Style

Chicago Chefs Get a Hot Lookbook by Haberdash

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Haberdash Lookbook

Courtesy Haberdash

Chicago men's store Haberdash recently published a free digital look-slash-cookbook featuring stylish local industry leaders like Publican Quality Meats co-owner Donnie Madia and Graham Elliot chief of operations Merlin Verrier (photo). The casual-cool vibe of the project underscores how the food and fashion scene continues to evolve and appeal to a wide swath of consumers. While Mario Batali boasts an orange-clog army, F&W Facebook fans stop by our live chats to ask fashionable chefs like Marcus Samuelsson about their wardrobes. (For the record, he wears a high-low mix of vintage, young designers and Marc Jacobs.) Samuelsson even appeared in the June issue of Vogue with his stunning model wife.

Titled "No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service," this online lookbook definitely lands towards the highbrow end of the spectrum, but also feels like a natural extension of the Haberdash brand. The company, which now runs two shops in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, plucked subjects from existing clients and styled the chefs with many American-made labels like New England Shirt Company and Alden boots. For those who have good taste covered, but not cooking, the recipes are also super simple to follow, like a Rum Old Fashioned made with honey syrup from the mixologist for Lettuce Entertain You restaurant group and Verrier's tasty-sounding Grilled Figs with Crispy Prosciutto, Fresh Ricotta, Smoked Almonds and Baby Arugula.

Style Find

How to Work Neon at Home

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Neon Laguiole Pocketknife

Laguiole Pocketknife Photo Courtesy of Sid Mashburn

Once relegated to highlighters and ’80s flashbacks, neon is having a sophisticated moment. Fluorescent pinks, greens and yellows are turning up on everything from nail polish to home decor. Paris-based housewares line Adónde makes neon look elegant by contrasting the Day-Glo shades with more natural materials. The company's eco-friendly Octa wastepaper baskets are inspired by geometric shapes like the polyhedron and made of recycled cardboard.

“Maybe the reason that neon is so popular now is for the same reason that we love using it—people like more natural colors, but they need a little twist to it, a touch of modernity,” says Adónde cofounder Laurent Serin. “We are kind of obsessed with neon pink,” adds cofounder Javier Gutierrez Carcache. Their favorite color also turns up on three-piece vases made of alder wood and French stoneware. Here, a variety of neon-accented items so you can experiment with the trend at home.
 
SHOPPING GUIDE

Laguiole has recreated its famous pocketknife in a neon-yellow hue (above). sidmashburn.com

Neon Salt and Pepper Shakers

Courtesy of La Tête au Cube.

 

 

 

Fluo porcelain salt and pepper shakers are handmade in Limoges, France, and come in bright yellow, orange and green. lateteaucube.com

Neon Throw Pillows

Courtesy of Shop Ten 25

 

 

 Gray linen pillows have just a thin border of Bold Orchid or Limeade piping. shopten25.com

Tart Server

Courtesy of Leif

 

 

This elegant acrylic tart server comes in 14 different colors, including Bright Fuchsia and Valencia, a vibrant red. leifshop.com

Style

Lulu DK's Nature-Inspired Design

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Lulu deKwiatkowski

Courtesy of LULU DK

 

 

With her latest eye-catching designs, Lulu deKwiatkowski is decorating the world with butterflies, flowers and peacocks.

Read more >

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Fresh Design

Color-Blocked Utensils

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Photo: Ryan Liebe for Milk Farm Road

It’s no surprise that, in the era of glamorous cooking shows and celebrity chefs, fashion trends get translated into cookware. Color-blocked apparel was all over the runways and in stores last fall, and you can now find this kind of graphic design in housewares as well. See F&W's shopping guide >

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Design

Pinterest Style Picks

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Pinterest is a social networking site for the visually inclined: Users bookmark web images, creating digital mood boards. Former F&W style editor Jessica Romm shares hers.

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Chefs

Haute Chef Style

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Gone are the days of sauce-splattered chefs hiding out in closed-door kitchens: With more restaurants embracing open-kitchen layouts, the chef is often as much on display as the food. On December 4 at Mercury Lounge in San Francisco, Fog City Diner executive chef and menswear designer Daniel Sudar launches his new Beyond Chef Wear line, fusing style and function for chef coats made from eco-friendly bamboo and cotton. Chef Alex Ong at Betelnut Restaurant and pastry chef Mitch Blanco at Zuni Cafe have already placed orders; Celebrity chef Art Smith and his husband are fans as well, and wore custom-tailored Daniel Sudar suits at their wedding last August. "I always want to be able to look good in my uniform," says Sudar.


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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.