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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Chefs Make Change

Peter Som's Custom Cronut Box

Peter Som's Cronut Box

Here's how to get tax-deductible cronuts. Read more >

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F&W Design Council

Owning a Brooklyn Design Shop

Brooklyn Design Shop Collyer’s Mansion

With its tree-lined streets and rows of Victorian mansions, Ditmas Park feels more like a small town than a neighborhood in the middle of Brooklyn, which made it the perfect location for the husband-and-wife team of Benjamin Heemskerk and Mauri Weakley to open their first store, Collyer’s Mansion. The couple leveraged her background in merchandising and his small-business experience to create a store offering a beautifully curated collection of antique finds, artisan goods and flea market curiosities. Here, they discuss their venture. Read more >

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Kitchen Design Tips

An Ultra-Practical, Bistro-Style Kitchen

A blogger's bistro-style kitchen.

At just 170 square feet, this St. Paul kitchen proves a space doesn't have to be enormous to be enviable—or functional. Food blogger and Francophile Eileen Troxel transformed her formerly dark, drafty kitchen without making it any bigger. She simply rearranged the layout, increasing her counter space from less than two feet to nearly 20 feet. Now she has plenty of room to cook and photograph dishes for Passions to Pastry, her blog on livingtastefully.weebly.com. Frequent trips to France inspired the creamy color palette and Old World materials, like statuary marble, which she used for the countertops and shelves. She left the shelves open to show off her collection of French porcelain and copper cookware. "I use all of those pieces a lot, so the pot hooks and open shelves are perfect," she says. Troxel entertains often and is looking forward to cooking for a big group on Thanksgiving. "Now there's room for everyone to be in the kitchen with me," she says.

How to Create the Look

1. Marble Shelves The five-foot-long shelves are made from the same statuary marble as the counters. The ornate wrought-iron shelf supports are by Rachiele. $120 each; rachiele.com

2. Tiles To add texture to the neutral color palette, Troxel installed easy-to-find, 3-by-6-inch Carrera marble tiles in a herringbone pattern on the walls.

3. Island The custom stainless steel table is 30 inches high, "the perfect height for me to roll and knead dough," she says, while the six-inch butcher block is just right for chopping.

4. Storage Troxel used to keep potatoes and onions in baskets on the floor. Now they are tucked away on tracks inside one of the cabinets.

5. Cabinets "I've admired this color scheme for years in magazines," says Troxel, who used Coastal Fog by Benjamin Moore to paint her custom-made Shaker-style cabinetry. rustynailwoodcraft.com

Related: Kitchen Design and Style Guide
Kelly Wearstler's 6 Rules for Kitchen Design
Food Bloggers' Best Kitchen Design Ideas

Style Find

Corn Holders for Elegant Ears

In 1910, the Austrian architect and design genius Josef Hoffman created the most gorgeous corn holders ever. Now exclusively sold by the Neue Galerie, the elegant, minimalist sterling silver holders can be purchased by the corn-eater who will only accept the best for $350 for two pairs. Amazon is currently offering some more traditional corn holders (corn-shaped, in plastic and stainless steel) at a more accessible price point ($3.77 for a set of six).

Related: Delicious Corn Recipes
Best Home Design Gifts
Extravagant Gifts for Food Lovers

F&W Style

Artisanal Garden Tools

Artisanal Garden Tools

Instead of selling mass-produced garden tools that break after a season, stores are now stocking beautiful implements that last.

Japanese Trowel This enameled trowel is marked like a ruler. $20; brookfarm
generalstore.com
.

Ash-Wood Spade Blacksmiths in Holland make this DeWit spade for dividing perennials, removing weeds and planting bulbs. $38; shopterrain.com.

Copper Hand Fork The tines on this Austrian hand fork deposit copper in the soil, which helps repel slugs and snails. $59; williams-sonoma.com.

Hori Hori Knife This Japanese tool has one straight edge, for weeding, and one serrated edge, for dividing plants. $35; williams-sonoma.com.

Hand-Forged Hoe The long handle on this hand hoe helps to reach around plants and dig at weeds. $42; ashfieldtools.nedjames.com.

Extra-Strong Hoe Part pickax and part hoe, this lightweight tool is great for weeding and pulling large stones out of the ground. $30; kaufmann-mercantile.com.

Sharp Shears Produced for more than 280 years in Sheffield, England, these Burgon & Ball steel garden shears are easy to use. $53; kaufmann-mercantile.com.

Garden Hod This harvest basket is made from reclaimed lobster traps. $45; planetnatural.com.

Related: American Artisans We Love
Beautiful Kitchen Tools
F&W's Garden Guide
Summer Produce Guide

Staff Favorites

Bronson van Wyck's Take-Home Style

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Take-Home Holiday Style

Photo © John Kernick.

Here’s what you’ll find at event planner Bronson van Wyck’s seasonal pop-up shop, through January 3, inside Manhattan’s Overbey & Dunn design store (19 Christopher St.).

Southern-Style Garlands
His garlands often feature magnolia leaves—some are gilded and others are flipped over to show the brown underside, a striking contrast to the dark-green leaves.

Bespoke Garlands and Wreaths
For customers who bring measurements, van Wyck’s shop will custom-make wreaths and garlands from magnolia leaves and other stunning foliage to fit individual spaces. From $300.

Christmas Trees
You can pick out a tree, then have it fitted with lights and hand-painted in amber by van Wyck’s staff. From $1,250.

Tartan Plaids
Tablecloths and napkins, some patterned after the tartan plaid of van Wyck’s mother’s Scottish clan, can be monogrammed in the store while you wait. From $100.

Signature Dressings and Mixers
Van Wyck bottled three kinds of salad dressings (two vinaigrettes and a Caesar) and two mixers (Bloody Mary and margarita) and hired Brooklyn design firm Madwell to create the retro labels. They are available online at vanwyck.net.

Related: Editor Picks: Perfect Presents
Best Christmas Gifts
Incredible Homemade Gifts

Style Find

3 Tips for Mixing Fall Florals at Home

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Orangerie-Rose Zephirine Wallpaper

Photo courtesy of Designers Guild / Osborne & Little.

Florals for spring are nothing new, but this season fashion designers such as Dolce & Gabbana, Suno and Derek Lam unveiled them in dark, bold colors like burgundy, burnt orange, navy and magenta. To apply the look indoors, Dutch interior designer Barbara Groen recommends juxtaposing various prints as she did earlier this year for her project “Flower Power 101.” Here, Groen’s tips for creating the supermodern look at home, along with a slideshow of floral accents.

1. Focus. Pick one room or area of the house and try to stick to a certain style of patterns: big flowers or mini flowers, bright colors or soft colors.

2. Repeat colors. For example, if the pattern is pink, try to put something pink in the room, or let the same pink come back in another pattern.

3. Try wallpaper as art. You can cover a big board in a special pattern, then hang it on your wall or put it on a side table or fireplace.

SLIDESHOW: FLORAL STYLE FINDS

Related: How to Work Neon at Home
Ikat: Modern Designs for a Traditional Pattern

Style Find

Gorgeous Tea Tins

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Tea Patina

Photo courtesy of Tortoise General Store.

F&W's October issue looks at the wisdom of aging, from barrel-aged cocktails to shopping finds that age gracefully. Since 1875, Kaikado in Japan has been creating metal tea tins that are meant to subtly change color and texture over time, developing a patina. Finally, the tins are available in the US. Brass transforms within a year; tin, three to five years and copper, just two to three months. From $140; tortoisegeneralstore.com.

Style Find

Ikat: Modern Designs for a Traditional Pattern

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Ikat Bowls

Courtesy of Worldmarket.com

Ikat is an ancient weaving technique used for centuries in South America and Southeast Asia to create rugs and textiles with a graphic tie-dye effect, and the distinctive look is now a trend in clothing and home accents. Designer Susan Connor prints the pattern on notebooks and pencil cases. >

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Style

Chicago Chefs Get a Hot Lookbook by Haberdash

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Haberdash Lookbook

Courtesy Haberdash

Chicago men's store Haberdash recently published a free digital look-slash-cookbook featuring stylish local industry leaders like Publican Quality Meats co-owner Donnie Madia and Graham Elliot chief of operations Merlin Verrier (photo). The casual-cool vibe of the project underscores how the food and fashion scene continues to evolve and appeal to a wide swath of consumers. While Mario Batali boasts an orange-clog army, F&W Facebook fans stop by our live chats to ask fashionable chefs like Marcus Samuelsson about their wardrobes. (For the record, he wears a high-low mix of vintage, young designers and Marc Jacobs.) Samuelsson even appeared in the June issue of Vogue with his stunning model wife.

Titled "No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service," this online lookbook definitely lands towards the highbrow end of the spectrum, but also feels like a natural extension of the Haberdash brand. The company, which now runs two shops in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, plucked subjects from existing clients and styled the chefs with many American-made labels like New England Shirt Company and Alden boots. For those who have good taste covered, but not cooking, the recipes are also super simple to follow, like a Rum Old Fashioned made with honey syrup from the mixologist for Lettuce Entertain You restaurant group and Verrier's tasty-sounding Grilled Figs with Crispy Prosciutto, Fresh Ricotta, Smoked Almonds and Baby Arugula.

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