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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Diary of a Line Cook

Never Step Out of the Rhythm and Into Your Head

What's More Distracting: Steak or Ego?

New Yorker Alfia Muzio, a former lawyer, currently works as a line cook at Marlow & Sons in Brooklyn.

I was overconfident. Maybe even showing off a little. There was a new guy in the kitchen, and perhaps I was a little anxious to prove that I knew something about sauté. My sous-chef had left me in her spot: expediting, plating, buffering between the front of house and the cooks. She had faith in me; I wanted to do it right! I was sure I could! So when the order for the big steak came in, I puffed out my chest a little, no sweat! I could lead the line through one big, very expensive steak! It was a slow night; I’d give that steak my full attention. If I needed back up, my sous-chef was downstairs, within earshot... Read more >

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Expert Travel Guide

Where to Eat in Dublin Right Now

Dublin Restaurants: The Fumbally

Writer Lauren Collins spent a weekend inside Dublin's booming DIY restaurant world. Here are nine must-visit spots. Read more >

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Expert Travel Guide

Dublin's New Indie Food Scene

Dublin's O'Connell Bridge

The bright side of Ireland's economic malaise? Dublin's food and drink scene is more fun than it's been in years. Writer Lauren Collins spends a weekend inside the city's booming DIY restaurant world. Read more >

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At-Home Sommelier

Why Sparkling Rosé Pairs with Everything

Chef Ignacio Mattos, left, and wine director Thomas Carter of New York City's Estela.

Estela's Thomas Carter shares fantastic sparkling rosé pairings that show why this style of wine is incredibly versatile and food-friendly. Read more >

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F&W Exclusive

Next Up at Next: Chicago Steakhouse

Chef Grant Achatz

Chef Grant Achatz. Photo courtesy Ethan Hill.

A few weeks back, molecular master Grant Achatz Twitter-teased the forthcoming theme at Next, his tickets-only Chicago restaurant. Now he’s given Food & Wine the scoop on the new menu, called Chicago Steakhouse, which debuts the first week in January. It will be a nostalgic throwback to the Mad Men era of big meat dining. “We’re going really traditional,” he says, “looking to revive the spirit of the old steak house. We want to transport people back in time and show them what it was really like to eat in the early 1950s, when a steak house was almost more of a club, with individual wine cellars and cigars.” He’ll be riffing on old-school classics like the iceberg wedge salad, oysters Rockefeller, creamed spinach and baked Alaska—using a wine press, for example, to extract juice from bones for bordelaise sauce, and poaching lobster meat sous vide for lobster Thermidor. The room will also reflect the era as much as possible, down to vintage china, elaborate candles and white linen tablecloths. “We don’t want to make it too dusty,” Achatz says, “but we want to hearken back to that period of over-the-top indulgence.” Tickets will be sold after Thanksgiving at nextrestaurant.com.


RelatedGrant Achatz Recipes
F&W Star Chef Grant Achatz
Brain Food: Grant Achatz

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Restaurant Intel

Rôtisserie Georgette’s Owner on Priceless Tips from Daniel Boulud and Eerily Beautiful Portuguese Tiles

As a born-and-reared New Yorker, Georgette Farkas knew immediately where she wanted to open her first restaurant: Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Rôtisserie Georgette, slated to open mid-November, boasts a menu full of roast meats, luscious sides and classic French desserts. Farkas, who spent years cooking professionally before she became Daniel Boulud’s public relations and marketing director in 1995, oversaw the entire design and construction of the restaurant. For her first solo venture, she brought back antique finds from France, scoured estate sales and unearthed hand-painted azulejo tiles from her parents’ travels. Read on for Farkas’s inspiration, design process and what she learned from Boulud. Read more >

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Expert Guide

Where to Eat in St. Louis

Chef Gerard Craft

Chef Gerard Craft. Photo courtesy of Greg Rannells Photography.

As the World Series heats up between the Red Sox and the Cardinals, baseball fans can drink and eat their nerves away at some fantastic local restaurants. Empire builder Barbara Lynch has shared her favorite spots in Boston. Here, chef Gerard Craft —whose restaurantPastaria often hosts Cardinals players—divulges his hit list for the St. Louis area. Read more >

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Restaurant Dispatch

Just in Time to Collect a Michelin Star, State Bird Provisions Reopens

State Bird Provision's new oyster bar.

San Francisco’s 2014 Michelin Guide ratings are in, and the single newly-starred restaurant is Best New Chef All-Star Stuart Brioza & Nicole Krasinski’s State Bird Provisions. The much-adored restaurant, which serves inventive small plates from roving dim sum carts, reopened just this weekend after 9-month remodel that expanded seating, refined the décor and added a stand-up oyster bar. “This is the more evolved, totally realized version,” Brioza says of the revamp, a collaboration with designer Wylie Price. One of Brioza's favorite details is a sleek, art-deco front door with a massive chrome handle salvaged from the space next door, where he and Krasinkski are planning to build an ambitious, multi-level restaurant called The Progress.

Related: San Francisco Travel Guide
Best New Chef All-Stars 2013
San Francisco Restaurants

Midwest Revival

New Takes on Midwestern Comfort Food

Midwestern Restaurant Reinventions

These Midwestern chefs are taking the homey foods of their childhood and modernizing them with spices and progressive techniques.

Butcher & the Boar (Minneapolis)
The Inspiration: Living in St. Paul, a city with a big German population, chef Jack Riebel ate lots of pan-fried pork chops with applesauce.
The Update: Riebel replaces chops with pork sausage and makes a sweet-tart sauce with hard cider, cider vinegar and pureed apples.

Rye (Leawood, KS)
The Inspiration: "Growing up in Kansas City in the 1970s, fried chicken was everywhere," says chef Colby Garrelts. "And then it just disappeared."
The Update: His fried chicken takes three days, starting with brining and ending with a baking powder-spiked batter for an extra-crispy crust.

Senate (Cincinnati)
The Inspiration: Chef Daniel Wright loves hot dogs with sauerkraut: "This area is known for sausages and hot dogs. We have access to incredible meat."
The Update: Wright puts a Korean spin on his beef hot dog, topping it with homemade kimchi, braised short rib and pickled cucumbers.

Related: 100 Restaurants Worth a Pilgrimage: North America
Minneapolis Travel Guide
Best Fried Chicken in the U.S.

F&W Obsessions

What to Eat Late-Night at Chez Panisse

Late-night Steak dinners at Chez Panisse.

The revered locavore restaurant loosens up with late-night steak frites.

One of the more tantalizing anecdotes about Chez Panisse in the mid-1970s (alongside all the sex and drugs and wine-soaked feasting with everybody from James Beard to Jean-Luc Godard) has always been the late-night steak menu that lasted for a few months in 1974. "There was no place to eat late in Berkeley, and it drove me crazy," says owner Alice Waters, who remembers driving all the way to San Francisco's old Vanessi's after work for steak frites. Her solution, bringing in a cook to grill New York strips after the regular staff went home, lost so much money that she banished it to the realm of nostalgia—until last winter. A few months later, when a fire gutted the front of the restaurant, repairs prompted a complete menu redesign, focusing even more attention on the revived late-night steak option.

If a recent Tuesday evening is any indication, bringing back this tradition was a savvy decision. Offered Monday through Thursday, from 9:30 to 10:30 p.m. or so (which passes for late-night in Berkeley), this dinner in the upstairs café is an incredible deal. For $25, diners get a glass of house Zinfandel produced by Napa's Green & Red Vineyard and a 100-percent grass-fed steak from rancher Bill Niman, skillet-roasted in the classic French manner, with marrow butter melting on top and red-wine jus pooling all around. On the side are lacy-thin fried potatoes (more shoelace than shoestring) or onion rings, next to extremely tender and tiny watercress or arugula.

At one time, the notion of late-night steak in sleepy, vegetarian-dense Berkeley would have been unthinkable. But now, when you leave Chez Panisse, the streets are filled with post-theater crowds, and the bar next door is roaring, and everything feels just right.

Related: Cooking Like Alice Waters
San Francisco Travel Guide
Star Chef Tips on Grilling Steak

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Congratulations to Mei Lin, winner of Top Chef Season 12.

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