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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Recipes

Chicken and Barley Like You've Never Seen It

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Pan-Seared Chicken Breasts

© John Kernick
Pan-Seared Chicken Breasts

Americans may have embraced farro and quinoa as alternative grains, but barley and oats have been left behind. NPR reports that while grain growers have pushed for an oats and barley resurgence, demand remains disappointingly low. We love the heart-healthy benefits of these grains along with their underappreciated versatility: See legendary French chef Michel Bras’s recipe for pan-seared chicken breasts topped with a rich, creamy barley foam.

Recipes

Meatless Marvel: Vietnamese Tofu Rolls

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause cravings, lip-smacking and an unshakeable desire to cook.

Cellophane Noodle and Tofu Rolls

This week in the F&W Test Kitchen, we whipped up recipes from Asian Tofu by respected cooking teacher and food blogger Andrea Nguyen. Her Cellophane Noodle and Tofu Rolls (left) are a clever vegetarian version of the classic Vietnamese pork-skin rolls called bi cuon. Strips of tofu are shallow-fried until crisp and tossed with soy-infused glass noodles, and together, they mimic the chewy texture and saltiness of traditional pork fillings. The tofu-noodle combo is then sprinkled with nutty toasted rice powder and wrapped in delicate rice paper with lettuce and mint. Nguyen serves the rolls alongside a drizzling sauce of lime juice, brown sugar, chiles, garlic and soy. Ten Speed Press will release the book early next year, but in the meantime, here are some phenomenal tofu recipes for the weekend, including Joe Kim’s playful Crunchy Tofu Tacos.

Recipes

April Bloomfield's Vinegary Chicken is Munchies-Worthy

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Lyon-Style Chicken with Vinegar Sauce

© Con Poulos
Lyon-Style Chicken with Vinegar Sauce

In the latest episode of Vice's online video series, "Munchies," NYC-based chef April Bloomfield hits up local restaurants with business partner Ken Friedman. Bloomfield already explored new territory with Food & Wine this October: The chef made her first trip to France, and returned with this delectably tangy Lyon-Style Chicken recipe.

Restaurants

5 Signs You Got a Bad Deal

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As the blogger behind The Bad Deal, Bloomberg News food critic Ryan Sutton chronicles some of the silliest and most deceptive dining offers on daily deal sites. Here, he reveals the warning signs that accompany bad restaurant deals.

Ryan Sutton

© Courtesy Ryan Sutton.
Ryan Sutton knows bad deals.

1. Your deal is a brunch deal. It’s Saturday morning. You’re hungover. You want to be in bed. But you purchased a deal that's only valid at brunch. And that deal expires today, which is too bad because most people pay in US dollars; greenbacks never expire. Maybe your coupon locks you into a dessert, which is pointless because you never eat dessert at brunch. Maybe your voucher involves multiple courses, like a recent New York event where six different breakfast courses were served at half hour intervals—that's three hours of brunch. Most brunch foods are already cheap, so is it really necessary to pay extra for something you don’t want?

2. Your deal includes mandatory wine pairings. Deals that come with a wine pairing for every guest may seem like a good value. But are you and your date going to be smashed after six pours of wine? Most likely. It’s usually cheaper to have the sommelier create an individualized selection of wines tailored to your own budget and alcohol tolerance. If you decide to stop drinking a pairing halfway through a meal, most good restaurants won't charge the full pairing price. But if you pay up front with a deal, that financial escape plan isn't an option.

3. You ordered a tasting menu at a neighborhood restaurant that never serves tasting menus. A ten-course, three-hour meal is a delicate ballet. Without rigorous pacing and precise portioning, you’ll overdose on food before the feast is half-over. These menus, whether cheap or expensive, are best ordered at restaurants that specialize in them. So it’s unfortunate that deal sites are turning tasting menus into ubiquitous commodities, an excuse to restrict choice and increase the bill at eateries that typically serve just appetizers, entrees and desserts. Here’s a good rule of thumb: If your tasting menu is only available through the dealsite, skip it. If you want something fancier, go to Le Bernardin.

4. The deal includes all-you-can-eat or all-you-can-drink. Do you usually leave restaurants feeling hungry and ripped-off? Do you think portion sizes in our diabetes-plagued country are too small? Do you want to be drunk during an 11 a.m. brunch? If you answered yes to these questions, then maybe you do actually want an all-you-can-eat-and-drink deal. For the more rational folk occasionally drawn to the offer of endless tacos, consider the following: Restaurants regularly impose strict fines if anyone else takes a sample from your never-ending basket of fries, a policy that defeats the communal experience of dining that attracts us to restaurants in the first place. Here’s a revolutionary alternative to the unlimited offer: Order something big and share.

5. You didn’t read the fine print. As economists often say, there’s no such thing as a free lunch. That means a deal isn’t a gift, it’s a trade-off. In exchange for a promised discount, you’re giving up certain freedoms, like the ability to eat on certain days of the week, or to order off the full menu. Those trade-offs are almost always buried in the fine print—read it. Another necessary step is comparing the deal's price with the restaurant's regular prices. Deal sites can overestimate savings by hundreds of dollars, and a restaurant's everyday offerings are often more affordable than the deal. So comb through the menu; getting your restaurant information from daily deal sites is like watching infomercials to learn about world affairs.

Related: 5 Signs You've Picked a Bad Restaurant
Cheap and Delicious Recipes
Bargain Wines

Cocktails

Adult Slushies (aka Shaketails)

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It’s a tough time for anyone with at least one eye on the wildly fluctuating stock market. So here’s something to make everyone feel better – or at least those adults who want to drink like children, and have valid id in case the bartender asks. Adult slushies (aka shaketails) have become wildly popular around the country. Here are a few great places to find them.

Tristan, Charleston. Cocktail popsicles are available in weekly changing flavors like Watermelon, White Balsamic Mojito and Firefly Southern Peach. Whether you want to down them as an aperitif or an extra chilled Happy Hour snack is your call.

Holsteins Shakes & Buns, Las Vegas. Located in the super-fun Cosmopolitan, Holsteins has a whole section of "bam-boozled" milkshakes on their dessert menu like the Cereal Bowl with vanilla vodka, Cap’n Crunch and Fruity Pebbles. The brand new "sorbet" shake is made with watermelon, bubblegum vodka and, surprise, liquid nitrogen. 

The Ritz-Carlton Downtown, Atlanta. Atlanta summers are so hot, it’s no surprise that the local Ritz came up with a super fun adult slushie. That would be their boozy, vibrantly colored snow cones,like Passionfruit with Lemon and Bourbon and the locally minded Moonshine-spiked one with Blackberry and Honey.

Village Whiskey, Philadephia. In July, chef Jose Garces premiered milkshakes at his two-year-old spot, which guests can order spiked or not. The long list of ingredients in the Irish Car Bomb includes rum-soaked devil’s food cake, whiskey-infused chocolate pastry cream and vanilla and chocolate ice creams; to make it even more appealing (to me anyway), it’s topped with a piece of cake.

Burger, Tap & Shake, Washington DC. Jeff Tunks, chef at this soon-to-open tavern, coined the term ‘shaketails’ and he’s taking it seriously enough to make almost everything in the drink in-house. The Dr.’s Cure mixes vanilla bean vodka with coffee liquor and vanilla ice cream. I’m not sure how the Teacher’s Pet got its name, but it combines apple brandy, ouzo, root beer with more vanilla ice cream.

La Esquina, Brooklyn. At the new outpost of the groovy Mexican restaurant in New York City, pastry chef Pichet Ong is creating a list of alcohol-soaked ices to serve to the Williamsburg locals. He’ll start with shaved ice and flavor it with tropical fruits like a pineapple margarita, flavored with fresh fruit puree, cilantro, tequila and, as is necessary for all good margaritas, salt.

Related: 20 Refreshing Drinks
Best Ice Cream Spots in the U.S.

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