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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Crazy Fried Chicken

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Super Crispy Fried Chicken

© Tina Rupp
Super-Crispy Fried Chicken

These days, it seems like it’s illegal to open up a restaurant and not put fried chicken on the menu. (Perhaps it’s a new stipulation in leases for dining establishments.) Some chefs take that mandate and serve straight-ahead, crispy fried chicken. But it’s the other cooks—the ones that decide they want to get a little bit wacky with their chicken—that we’ll focus on now.
 
Pine State Biscuits; Portland, OR. For some people, a piece of fried chicken is indulgent enough. Those people should not go to Pine State Biscuits and order the Wedgie: a biscuit filled with buttermilk fried chicken, a fried green tomato, iceberg lettuce and blue cheese dressing. And they definitely shouldn’t order the Reggie Deluxe, because that’s a biscuit topped with fried chicken, bacon, cheddar, gravy and an over-easy fried egg.
 
Hot Sauce and Panko; San Francisco. Is it a fried chicken spot? A Belgian waffle place? A hot sauce shop? Actually, it’s all three. At Hot Sauce and Panko, you can get 10-plus kinds of chicken wings, 92 types of hot sauces and five options for your waffles. The KFC (Korean Fried Chicken) is its best seller; you can try it with Big Papi en Fuego Grand Slam XXXtra Hot Sauce. If you want waffles on the side, you can have them naked or with “veggi” bacon.
 
Supper; Philadelphia.
Personally, I think pickles should be a required side for fried chicken. Chef Mitch Prensky of Supper agrees with me. His new Jewish Fried Chicken has a spear or two of garlic pickle alongside the chicken, which is cured with a pastrami-spiced brine, then coated with a mixture that includes more pastrami seasoning, then fried. (Guess what else Prensky serves on the side? Fried matzo balls.)
 
Blue Ribbon at Brooklyn Bowl; New York City. Don’t get me started on all the amazing places to eat fried chicken in New York City. But there is just one place where you can bowl, see Biz Markie perform (or Kanye West, if you have super-good connections), drink hyper-local beer and eat amazing Blue Ribbon fried chicken. Chefs Eric and Bruce Bromberg give you the option of fried chicken dinners with white meat, dark meat or a mix of both.
 
American Cupcake; San Francisco. Take two of the biggest food trends in recent years—fried chicken and the unstoppable cupcake wave—and you come up at the same place as the Bay Area’s American Cupcake. They soak chicken in red velvet cake batter and then, for good measure, coat it in red velvet cupcake bits before frying. It’s served with cream cheese-infused mashed potatoes that just might conjure up a vision of frosting.  
 
Husk; Charleston, SC. Forget the focus on super-secret batter recipes. Star chef Sean Brock is hard at work trying to answer the question, “Just how many fats can chicken be fried in?” Brock’s chicken, which is available by reservation only and requires 48 hours notice, is fried in butter, chicken fat, bacon fat and country ham fat. Wow.
 
Related: Best Fried Chicken in the U.S.
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Recipes

(Dino) Chicken Legs with Red Wine Sauce

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Spiced Chicken Legs

© Tina Rupp
Spiced Chicken Legs

Paleontologist and Jurassic Park consultant Jack Horner tells Wired about his plans to reverse-engineer a dinosaur from a chicken in the magazine’s October issue. While there are many, many questions that surround Horner’s controversial work, one in particular has stuck in our minds: What wine would pair with dino meat? Luckily, he answered that in Wired’s "Storyboard" podcast. According to Horner, dinosaur meat would be dark meat. So, much like with chicken thighs or legs, a red wine would be appropriate. Though Horner does not foresee a world where the genetically engineered "chickensaurus" will walk among us, we can’t help but think that they’d taste lovely in this recipe for Spice-Braised Chicken Legs with Red Wine and Tomato. After all, we should eat them before they eat us, right?

Related: Chicken Recipes
Chicken Thigh Recipes

Recipes

Alice Waters's Vibrant Red Kuri Squash Soup

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause cravings, lip-smacking and an unshakeable desire to cook.

Red Kuri Squash Soup

© Justin Chapple
Red Kuri Squash Soup

This week, F&W's Test Kitchen Supervisor Marcia Kiesel prepared a Red Kuri Squash Soup from Alice Waters that exemplifies the farm-to-table pioneer's culinary philosophy: Cooking should exalt the finest seasonal ingredients. Red kuri squash—sometimes called Japanese squash—produces a gorgeous deep-orange soup that is nutty, slightly sweet and naturally creamy. Waters uses water as a base, as opposed to stock, and enhances the flavor of the soup with simple aromatics like onion and bay leaf. For fun, she recommends adding a variety of garnishes, like pecans, extra-virgin olive oil, fresh herbs and our favorite, roasted fennel. This recipe will go to print early next year, but for now, we can recommend a healthy alternative from another West Coast chef: Thomas Keller protégé Timothy Hollingsworth tops his roasted squash soup with pecans and maple-glazed bananas.

 

Recipes

Sesame Chicken Would Taste Great with Super Broccoli

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Sesame Coated Chicken

© Lucy Schaeffer
Sesame Coated Chicken

According to the Associated Press, British scientists spent 14 years developing "super broccoli," a crossbreed of traditional broccoli with a wild Sicilian variety that’s rich in the nutrient glucoraphanin. Already sold as Beneforte in California and Texas, the new (non–genetically modified) hybrid will hit stores across the US this fall. Glucoraphanin has been linked to heart-attack prevention, but even skeptics can appreciate the vegetable—both the regular and souped-up versions—tossed with this quick sesame chicken.

Related: Fast Chicken Recipes
Fast Asian Recipes

Recipes

The Most Underrated Ingredient: Homemade Chicken Stock

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Classic Chicken Stock

© John Kernick
Classic Chicken Stock

In a recent edition of the Wall Street Journal’s "In My Kitchen" series, Louisiana-based chef John Besh asserted, "The most underrated ingredient is a good chicken stock. You give me a good stock, and there’s probably nothing I can’t make." We also exalt this gravy-making essential, which is why our November issue features three chicken stock recipes. F&W's Marcia Kiesel created a fast Pressure-Cooker Stock; David Chang shared his innovative Freeze-Dried Chicken Stock recipe; and legendary French chef André Soltner provided an example of a perfect Classic Chicken Stock that works in small batches.

Related: Thanksgiving Recipes

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