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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Farms

Back to School: Culinary Classes

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The September issue reveals some of the hottest new culinary classes that teach amateurs how to make fresh pasta, martinis and more.

Culinary Classes: Pasta Crash Course

© © Antonis Achilleos
Culinary Classes: Pasta Crash Course

Pasta Crash Course: Flour + Water, San Francisco
In the restaurant's Dough Room, chef Thomas McNaughton teaches a three-part pasta curriculum, from beginner (flat noodles) to advanced (stuffed pasta). The fee includes dinner and pasta to take home. Pasta classes, $220.

Pop-Up Lessons: Flash Kitchen; Portland, OR
With sponsorship from Whole Foods, local chefs like Beaker & Flask's Ben Bettinger teach free cooking classes in parks and schools throughout the city. And plans are in the works to expand  to cities like New York City, Chicago and Oakland, California. Free classes; facebook.com/WholeFoodsMarketPortland.

Farm School: Love Apple Farms; Santa Cruz, CA
Blogger Pim Techamuanvivit and famed Manresa chef David Kinch offer tours of his kitchen-garden farm, plus cooking lessons and a meal. Cooking classes, $145.

Cocktails 101: Whistler, Chicago
On Sunday afternoons at his Logan Square bar, mixologist Paul McGee teaches students the cocktail basics—syrups, garnishes, tools. He also serves them three great drinks and sends them off with a copy of his recipe book.Cocktail classes, $95

Related: Gastronaut: How to Make Sushi with Morimoto

Restaurants

Preview: Le Fooding's 52 Hour Dinner

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Brooks Headley gets ready to cook at 5 am for Le Fooding.

In NYC, you can do so many exciting things all day and all night, and one of the best things to do is eat. Le Fooding, the irreverent, globe-trotting French food festival, gets that about my city in a big way. As part of their third annual NYC event, Le Fooding will premier The Exquisite Corpse rotating meal. Starting at 9 pm on September 23rd, and for the next 52 hours, 13 terrific chefs from around the world will cook in four-hour shifts, using something left over from the preceding chef. (The term 'exquisite corpse' will mean something to you if you're familiar with French Surrealism.)

Food & Wine has a pre-sale link to those Exquisite Corpse tickets, here. (They're $100 for each meal, plus a half-bottle of Veuve Clicquot and there's only 40 tickets available for each dinner.) Among the rotating chefs are Italy's Massimo Bottura, France's Adeline Grattard of Yam'Tcha and New York City's Andrew Carmellini.

To get a sense of just how cool this Exquisite Corpse dinner is going to be, let’s spotlight Brooks Headley, the awesome pastry chef at NYC’s del Posto. He’s got the 9th shift of the series, starting at 5 am on September 24th. “That's totally the witching hour in New York City,” says Headley. In keeping with that thought, Headley is making dishes like Green Fennel Ravioli-Filled Live Potato Ears in Tomato Broth. And then, for his main course, a vegan chocolate staff meal, which might look a little like the amazing (vegan) chocolate crème brulee he made with the band No Age for Eater a few weeks ago. Here’s more from Headley: “Since it will be like, 7 am, by the time we get to chocolate staff meal, it will be served (and some of it even made) in the style of a Del Posto staff meal. Which will be hands-on interactive, and hopefully kind of hilarious.”

I can't wait to be part of Headley's vegan staff meal. And see how many of Le Fooding's 52-hour meal I can stay up for.

Recipes

Popeye-Inspired Chicken Should Not Affect Hair Growth

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Chicken with Olive, Capers and Roasted Lemons

© Tina Rupp

A British publisher will release The Popeye Cookbook in October—a health-focused tome featuring plenty of spinach and olive oil to celebrate the sailor and his gangly paramour, Olive Oyl. “These recipes are meant to build you up, give you hair on your chest and immediate strength,” the firm’s marketing director told The Guardian this week. As appealing as that sounds, you will not wake up with extra fur after making this healthy recipe for Sautéed Chicken with Olives, Capers and Roasted Lemons, served with baby spinach.

Recipes

Crazy-Good Eggs Benedict

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause lip-smacking, cravings and an unshakeable desire to cook.

© Justin Chapple

In the F&W Test Kitchen this week, senior recipe developer Grace Parisi whipped up one of the best brunch dishes of all time—eggs benedict. The version seen here, made with serrano ham and a luxuriously creamy hollandaise sauce, was so dreamy, our editors couldn’t keep their forks (or hands) off of it. The recipe is still being fine-tuned, but in the meantime, here are a plethora of Brunch Recipes to try this weekend.

Menus

A Menu Edward Scissorhands Would Love

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Tim Burton (American, b. 1958), Untitled (Edward Scissorhands), 1990, Pen and ink, and pencil on paper, 14 1/4 x 9" (36.2 x 22.9 cm), Private Collection

© Twentieth Century Fox, © 2011 Tim Burton
Tim Burton (American, b. 1958), Untitled (Edward Scissorhands), 1990, Pen and ink, and pencil on paper, 14 1/4 x 9" (36.2 x 22.9 cm), Private Collection


As I reported a few weeks back, museum restaurants are undergoing a new wave of innovation—a happy trend for those equally obsessed with food and art, like the amazing trendsetters we profile in our September 2011 issue. In Los Angeles, chef Kris Morningstar geeks out on the chance to get creative with the menu at Ray’s & Stark Bar, the new Renzo Piano–designed restaurant at the L.A. County Museum of Art. For the current Tim Burton exhibition, Morningstar consulted with the famously kooky director to develop menu specials like White Rabbit with Tea in a Mushroom Forest, a bacon-wrapped saddle of rabbit with chanterelle mushrooms and pistachio crumble. “Our goal is not to be pretentious,” says Morningstar, “but we felt that, for Tim Burton, the menu should be a little bit off the wall.” The Burton classic Edward Scissorhands (my personal favorite) meets its culinary counterpart in a dish of razor clams (ha ha) and burnt octopus in squid-olive broth, garnished with a trimmed “hedge” of fresh herbs. If you need a cocktail to get into the macabre mood, try the Dr. Burton at Stark Bar: The rum-and-amaro-based concoction evokes the flavors of Burton’s favorite soda, Dr Pepper. The specials will be available through the exhibition’s close on Halloween. Next up: architecture-inspired plates to celebrate the upcoming California Design exhibit this fall.

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