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By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Expert Guide

Five Great Wine Values $12 & Under

Five Great Wine Values $12 & Under

Here, F&W's executive wine editor suggests five top picks for $12 or less.

2012 Vega Sindoa Tempranillo ($9)
A tiny cooperative of eight Navarran families grows the grapes for this bright, crisp Spanish red.

2010 Vale do Bomfim Douro Red ($11)
This blend of native Portuguese grapes from the Douro Valley is surprisingly complex.

2012 Dry Creek Vineyard Dry Chenin Blanc ($12)
A perennial value, Dry Creek's Chenin Blanc offers layers of citrus-melon flavor.

2010 Il Molino di Grace Il Volano ($12)
A fresh, herby Tuscan red, it's a blend of Sangiovese with 2percent Merlot.

2011 Novellum Chardonnay ($12)
This fragrant Chardonnay is made with hand-harvested grapes from France's Côtes Catalanes region.

Related: Where to Buy Wine Online
In Search of Good Cheap Wine
America's Best and Most Accessible Value Wines

Kitchen Trash

Fall Preview: Blue Cheese Lollipops & Hot Ginger Ale

The Internet is a black hole for strange, weird and wonderful things—especially when it comes to food. Rather than dive in yourself, let F&W do it for you. Here, five of the most absurd food items we saw this week.

Mutant Lobster Found: A six-clawed lobster was recently caught off Hyannis, MA by a fishing boat featured on the Discovery Channel show Lobster Wars. The 10-year-old, four pounder “Lola” has a normal right claw, but her left is made up of five mini claws. Sorry, lobster claw-lovers, you won’t be seeing Lola on a menu any time soon. She is currently on display at the Maine State Aquarium.

Chopstick Straws: Soup Sticks could revolutionize how we eat ramen. Part straw, part chopstick, they enable the ramen eater to both scoop up noodles and slurp broth. This is bad news for the spoon business, unless you consider how stupid you would look drinking soup through a straw.

Hot and Fizzy Ginger Ale: You know how good a can of ginger ale is after being left in a hot car for a couple of days? Starting October 21, a hot version of Canada Dry’s ginger ale will be sold in Japan. Autumnally flavored with ginger, apple and cinnamon, the hot and spritzy drink will be pre-heated and dispensed from vending machines.

Gender-Biased Eggs: Kids don’t want your dumb adult eggs. They want eggs for them! Prior, a Norwegian purveyor of eggs and chicken, has introduced Princess Eggs (eggs in a pink carton with a princess on the label) and Pirate Eggs (eggs in a blue carton with a pirate on the label).

Blue Cheese Lollipops: When you don’t have time for the cheese course after dinner, just take it to-go in the form of Lollyphile’s new blue cheese lollipop. For an appropriate pairing, the sweet, salty and pungent candy should be enjoyed not with wine but with grape soda.

Related Links: America's Best Lobster Rolls
Delicious Egg Recipes
Cooking with Cheese

Trendspotting

3 Fashionable Foods

During New York Fashion Week (with a view from the Amex SkyBox), we realized that some of our favorite foods are totally ahead of the Spring 2014 trends. Here's how to eat in style.

Pleated Dumplings: Proenza Schouler presented a new take on pleats for Spring 2014. "The silk cloque pleated skirts and dresses were foil printed, so when you open them up, it creates a graphic quality," explained Jack McCollough to the L.A. Times. We've long known the importance of pleating, especially when it comes to adorably crimped homemade dumplings. And when you open these up, there's a beautiful filling of lemongrass-scented ground chicken.

Oversized Biscuits: Volume is a huge trend that's sticking around through spring. The Telegraph even described teeny talent Victoria Beckham's statement dress at "massive." It totally fits with Vogue's declaration that comfort is in right now. Oversized styles also happen to be ideal after one eats giant biscuits, which we plan to do this fall, especially if they’re filled with pastrami or a sausage patty.

Dip-Dye Radishes: The next phase of ombré hair (dark roots and bright tips) could be the return of dip-dying. But these aren't the Kool-Aid-colored strands of yore. Harper's Bazaar described the dyed hair at Peter Som's Spring 2014 show as having a "faded antique effect," with extensions in shades of amethyst and dusty rose. Food obsessives that we are, the naturally-occuring colors seem almost vegetal to us, specifically radish-y. These French Breakfast radishes have tops that are soft red-pink and white bottoms.


Related: A Fashionably Late Dinner Party with Erin Featherson
Zang Toi’s Fashion Party: New Years Eve
The World’s Most Beautiful Restaurant Dishes

Expert Travel Guide

Portland's Best Places to Drink Wine

Chef Vitaly Paley

F&W's October issue is dedicated to wine. Here, fantastic spots to drink it in Portland, Oregon.

The Bent Brick
A gastropub by F&W Best New Chef 2004 Scott Dolich, offering more than a dozen Pacific Northwest wines on tap. thebentbrick.com

Higgins
The best place in town to try reserve vintages from producers like Eyrie. higginsportland.com

Imperial
Chef Vitaly Paley's new modern Pacific Northwest restaurant. Kimberly Paley's wine list is an A–Z guide to the top Willamette Valley producers. imperialpdx.com

Raven & Rose
A historic carriage house from the 1880s, beautifully renovated, with wood-oven, farmhouse cooking. The wine list includes Abacela and other producers from southern Oregon, an up-and-coming part of the state. ravenandrosepdx.com

Sauvage
An offshoot of the adjacent Fausse Piste urban winery, this tiny oeno-pub serves local game and seafood alongside its small-production, naturally fermented wines. sauvagepdx.com

Related: Fantastic Portland Restaurants
Portland Travel Tips
Chef Jenn Louis's Insider Portland Guide

Supermarket Sleuth

Delicious Dukkah

F&W food editors apply their incredible cooking knowledge to explaining what to do with a variety of interesting ingredients.

Every summer, I seem to become obsessed with something new from the Fancy Food Show that takes place in early July. This year it’s dukkah, the fantastically versatile herb, seed and nut blend from Egypt, which seems to go with just about everything. The mix is named for the Egyptian word “to crush,” and like so many blends, the variations are limitless. Most versions seem to include sesame seeds and hazelnuts, along with the herbs and spices, but many also include coconut and chickpeas. Try dukkah in the simplest way, as a second dunk for oil-dipped bread. Then venture beyond and have it as a second dip after yogurt or tzatziki, mixed into other dips as a seasoning, sprinkled on sautéed or roasted vegetables, tossed into salads or as a crust for sautéed chicken or fish. Two brands I especially like are from Gary and Kit’s Napa Valley, and KL Keller Food Ways. Or you can make your own delicious versions: Dukka,
Egyptian Spiced Carrot Puree

Related Links: Quick Appetizers
Fantastic Party Dips
Delicious Middle Eastern Recipes

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