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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Chicken Dance

Bizarre Foods 100th Episode

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Shrimp-and-Chicken Skewers

© Stephanie Meyer / Chicken Skewers

Tonight, F&W contributing editor Andrew Zimmern will host the 100th episode of Bizarre Foods on the Travel Channel at 9/8 p.m. CST. The season six premiere will be preceded by an hour-long retrospective featuring highlights from Zimmern's quest to travel the globe and sample the world’s weirdest, tastiest and at times squirmiest foods (like giant coconut worms). In his Kitchen Adventures series for foodandwine.com, Zimmern likes to adapt some of his exotic finds into delicious, never-scary recipes for home cooks. He found inspiration for these Golden Coin Chicken-Shrimp Skewers with Peanut Sauce in Guangzhou, China, but likes to serve them Thai-style in lettuce wraps. They're the perfect finger food for a Bizarre viewing party.

Related: More Recipes from Andrew Zimmern
Street Food Adventures
Wild Seafood

Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Memories of South Fork and Cioppino with Mussels

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Cioppino with Mussels

© Stephanie Meyer

As a young boy growing up in New York City, we would spend our summers on the South Fork of Long Island. My dad would take me down to the beach at low tide, we would walk a mile down to the jetties and he would lower me by my ankles into the crevices between the massive boulders to grab at huge ropes of mussels. We would crab on Georgica pond for fun, pull clams out of Gardiners Bay, fish for porgies and snappers and make up any deficits for our Saturday dinners at the local seafood store. I thought we were foraging, but now that I am a dad, I realize this was my pop’s way of staying sane on rainy days with a seven-year-old to look after. We would haul our treasure home and my mother would make a superb summer fish stew out of whatever we brought in the door. My mom was as brilliant a cook as my dad is. She passed away a few months ago, and I am recooking my way through her recipe bin. My mother went to college at Mills, in San Francisco, and she roomed with Trader Vic Bergeron’s daughter. Vic taught them to cook late at night in the kitchen of the original outpost of the international Polynesian restaurant concept that still bears his name. Vic loved to eat, according to my mom, and while pupu platters were more his thing when it came to selling food, he loved the cuisine of northern California and made sure my mom knew how to make a simple cioppino before she graduated.

This easy and simple tomato-and-wine-spiked seafood stew is a Bay Area staple. Cioppino was supposedly created in the late 19th century by Portuguese and Italian fishermen who settled in the region from Genoa, Italy. Like all these types of dishes, it was first made on the boats while the men were out at sea and then found its way into the Italian restaurants that exploded on the scene in San Francisco. The name comes from ciuppin, a Ligurian word meaning “to chop” or “chopped,” which described a fisherman’s chore of chopping up scraps and bits of the day’s catch that weren’t sellable.

This recipe has been in my family since the early ’50s in one way or another and I love it. Serve it with plenty of toasts made from sourdough boule and a large, bracing green salad.

Go to Recipe: Cioppino with Mussels

See More of Andrew Zimmern’s Kitchen Adventures

The Week in Food

The Greatest Thing Before Sliced Bread

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Potpie Topped with Sliced Bread

Potpie Topped with Sliced Bread; © Stephanie Foley

Sliced bread is such an American standard that it's easy to forget that the boon to quick sandwiches and buttery morning toast is a 20th century luxury. Inventor Otto Frederick Rohwedder spent more than a decade perfecting the prototype for a machine that could both slice bread and wrap it to prevent staleness. Missouri’s Chillicothe Baking Company snagged his revolutionary design, and sold the first loaf of mechanically sliced bread on July 7, 1928.

Today, packaged bread remains a go-to kitchen shortcut. F&W's Grace Parisi even uses it to replace labor-intensive pastry crust in her fast Skillet Chicken-and-Mushroom Potpie, topped with slices of buttered white bread that become beautifully browned in the oven.


Follow Jasmin on Twitter @jasminsun.

Related: F&W’s Ultimate Bread Guide
Delicious Sandwiches
Best Grilled Cheese in the U.S.

Chicken Dance

Paul Bocuse’s Fast and Healthy Chicken

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Chicken in Vinegar Sauce

© Tina Rupp / Chicken in Vinegar

Trading in one legendary epicurean inspiration for another, the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY will replace its Escoffier Restaurant with one named after French master chef Paul Bocuse. According to the Poughkeepsie Journal, the new restaurant will open next year. The old student-staffed project worked from August Escoffier’s authoritative resource Le Guide Culinaire, while the new will reflect Bocuse’s lighter cooking style. In keeping with his legacy, this fast Bocuse recipe for Chicken in Vinegar Sauce uses fresh tomatoes and mild vinegar for flavor in a traditionally ultra buttery French classic.

Related: Recipes from the French Masters
Healthy French Recipes
Fast Chicken Dishes

Drink This Now

Delicious Cocktails Made with Grilled, Caramelized Fruits

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Grilled Pineapple Cocktail

Courtesy of The Ritz Carlton Naples Grill

Cocktails are never far from the grill in summer. But now, bartenders are closing the gap, grilling fruit to incorporate rich, caramelized flavors into their drinks.

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