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By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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3 Nouveau Vintage Hotels

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St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, then and now.

Photo © St Pancras Renaissance Hotel.

F&W's October issue looks at the wisdom of aging, from barrel-aged cocktails to timeworn spaces. Here, three beautifully renovated historic hotels.

St. Pancras Renaissance, London (photo)

Then: Built in 1873 as part of the city’s St. Pancras train station, the hotel offered central heating, a Moroccan-style coffee shop and an opulent restaurant—the height of Victorian-era hospitality and luxury.

Now: After a 76-year closure, St. Pancras has been carefully restored, including reproductions of the original glassware, with some modern design touches. A concession to the times: Rooms have iPads. stpancras.com.

The Algonquin, New York City

Then: A Jazz Age-era hotel and famous watering hole for the city’s intelligentsia, it was the site of Dorothy Parker’s Round Table. Owner Frank Case was known to offer free rooms to struggling authors.

Now: All 174 rooms have been renovated, some for the first time since the hotel’s 1902 opening. The Blue Bar has been updated, and the Oak Room cabaret turned into a lounge. algonquinhotel.com.

Hotel Bel-Air, Los Angeles

Then: Opened in 1946, the hotel became a favorite of 1950s Hollywood. Rita Hayworth, Bette Davis and Tony Curtis were regulars. Marilyn Monroe sat for one of her final photo shoots here and Grace Kelly stayed the night she won her Oscar.

Now: Recently renovated, the property has a new eponymous restaurant by Wolfgang Puck, who also masterminded the bar, lounge and room-service menus. A signature dish and locavore favorite: snapper crudo with Santa Barbara uni. hotelbelair.com.

Grace in the Kitchen

One-Pot Wonder

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Chilaquiles-Style Roasted Chicken Legs

Chilaquiles is a baked Mexican dish that's often made with leftover shredded chicken, tortilla strips and cheese. This version bakes whole chicken legs with tomatoes, hominy, jalapeños and tortilla chips.

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

One-pot suppers are kind of amazing—especially if you don't dirty too many bowls in the prep. My favorites are ones where a bready/noodly/potatoey base soaks up all the delicious fat and juices from what's roasted above. Case in point is this muy delicioso Mexican-style casserole that combines tortilla chips with diced tomatoes, hominy, pickled jalapeños and spices and tops it with spicy chicken legs. Some of the chips get soggy, while others get supercrispy—but they get infused with all those flavorful chicken drippings. Which reminds me of Sunday suppers when I was a kid—my mom made the most delicious roasted lemon chicken legs. The juices were crazy delicious and rarely made it to the table because we were practically fighting each other off just to dip hunks of bread into the pan. "Bagna!" as my mom would say. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Delicious Fast Chicken Recipes
Fantastic Roast Chicken Recipes
Best Fried Chicken in the U.S.

Kitchen Trash

5 Reasons Why This is the Last Season of MTV's Jersey Shore

Style Find

Gorgeous Tea Tins

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Tea Patina

Photo courtesy of Tortoise General Store.

F&W's October issue looks at the wisdom of aging, from barrel-aged cocktails to shopping finds that age gracefully. Since 1875, Kaikado in Japan has been creating metal tea tins that are meant to subtly change color and texture over time, developing a patina. Finally, the tins are available in the US. Brass transforms within a year; tin, three to five years and copper, just two to three months. From $140; tortoisegeneralstore.com.

Supermarket Sleuth

Oldie but a Goodie

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Courtesy of The Maldon Crystal Salt Company

Courtesy of The Maldon Crystal Salt Company

F&W Executive Food Editor Tina Ujlaki applies her incredible cooking knowledge to explaining what to do with a variety of interesting ingredients.

I have a few kinds of salts in my pantry, and I actually use them all. But my favorite finishing salt—the one I sprinkle on sunny-side up eggs, on avocado toasts, on simple sautéed sugar snap peas or asparagus, and on caramel sauce or fudge sauce over ice cream—is Maldon salt.

Unlike table salt and kosher salt, Maldon has large, irregular, ultralight flakes that have a fantastic crunch and a mild, clean flavor that lingers in the best possible way. I have never used it to season a soup or a stew, and it would get lost in a pasta sauce. Even though it’s superpopular with chefs today, the company is more than 125 years old. Maldon salt is available at supermarkets and specialty food shops nationwide. If you want to learn more, check out the company here.

Here are a few of my favorite recipes featuring this pantry must-have: 
Crunchy Baked Potatoes with Maldon Salt
Chocolate Wafers with Ginger, Fennel and Sea Salt
Salted Fudge Brownies


Related: Sweet and Salty Desserts
Salt Recipes

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