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By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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What Will the Food World Look Like in 2013?

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Chef Dan Barber. © Andrew Hetherington

Chef Dan Barber. // © Andrew Hetherington

While the Euro may still exist, and kitchen refrigerators aren’t posting online status updates just yet, other predictions made during The World in 2012 Festival hosted last year by The Economist proved to be on point—like the euro-zone crisis and Facebook's first public offering. With global hunger issues on the rise, and today's chefs garnering as much attention as rock stars, the future of food will be a hot topic at this year's The World in 2013 Festival, held December 6 and 8 in NYC. Chef-activist and writer Dan Barber of Blue Hill at Stone Barns will discuss the current global food crisis, focusing on issues of worldwide obesity, agricultural sustainability and soaring food prices.

Facebook co-founder Sean Parker and Daniel Ek, founder of social music platform Spotify, are slated to kick off the two-day event with a technology and society panel at Thursday’s gala dinner. A roster of notable figures in politics, business, science and the arts—including chef Barber—round out the line-up on Saturday, leading discussions and debates on topics ranging from human nature to issues in energy, health care and the world’s emerging economies.

The Economist is selling full package tickets for both Thursday night’s dinner and Saturday’s speaker panels for $550. Separate tickets are $495 and $75, respectively. A schedule of the festival’s events, speakers and topics is available here

Follow Jasmin on Twitter @jasminsun.


Related: Recipes from Farm-to-Table Chefs
10 Recipes by Sustainable Food Visionairies
Chef Dan Barber Bio and Recipes

Wine Wednesday

Real Names of Wine

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© Kathryn Rathke

© Kathryn Rathke

The truth about wine grapes is that they rarely have one name—Pinot Noir, for instance, may be Pinot Noir to you and me (and to the French), but to the Austrians it’s Blauburgunder, to the Italians it’s Pinot Nero and to the Croatians it’s either Burgundac Crni or Modra Klevanyka, though I’m a bit vague on why it’s sometimes one and sometimes the other. In any case, here’s a handy guide to some of the more common of wine’s identical twins »

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Tasting Room

Australian Shiraz: A Regional Guide

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Australia has more than 65 wine regions, each of them with its own climate and soil type. As a result, the wines from each region have their own distinctive characters. Here’s a geographic guide to Aussie Shiraz:

Shiraz: A Regional Guide

Shiraz: A Regional Guide. Art © Alex Nabaum.

Warm Climate (Pink Dots)
Regions: Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Heathcote, Langhorne Creek
Character: Ripe blackberries, massively rich, lots of power
Wine to Try: 2010 Torbreck Barossa Valley Woodcutter’s Shiraz ($22)
Food Pairing: Braised short ribs

Moderate Climate (Green)
Regions: Eden Valley, Clare Valley, Margaret River
Character: Tangy blackberries, substantial body, licorice and black pepper notes
Wine to Try: 2010 Jim Barry The Lodge Hill Clare Valley Shiraz ($19)
Food Pairing: Lamb chops

Cool Climate (Blue)
Regions: Great Southern, Yarra Valley, Coonawarra, Frankland River
Character: Raspberries, medium-bodied with higher acidity, herb and white pepper notes
Wine to Try: 2010 Innocent Bystander Victoria Shiraz ($20)
Food Pairing: Roast duck

Related: In Defense of Australian Shiraz

Chef Intel

Leave Joe Beef in Peace, Stop Ordering the Double Down

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Montreal's Joe Beef is known for some seriously decadent dishes: massive steaks served with marrow bones, lobster spaghetti in bacon-brandy cream sauce and, most infamously, the foie gras Double Down. Co-creator David McMillan recently revealed to F&W that the dish was conceived as a bit of a prank on gimmick-hungry food writers—and that it backfired.

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Trendspotting

Serving Finger Foods with Style

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Eating with your hands isn’t just acceptable for cocktail parties and raiding the fridge, it’s now common practice at some of the country’s top restaurants. Here, F&W's Kate Krader spotlights some of the more interesting serving vessels.

Beet Tumbleweeds at Minibar in Washington, DC

Beet Tumbleweeds at Minibar in Washington, DC. Photo courtesy of Powers and Crewe.

Minibar; Washington, DC
To present small bites like beet tumbleweed—a string of fried and tangled beet (photo)—chef and owner José Andrés had artist Sami Hayek make porcelain molds of his hands. minibarbyjoseandres.com.

Travail; Robbinsdale, MN
Chefs Mike Brown, James Winberg and Bob Gerken first introduced extra-long forks to feed their modern-American food directly to guests at the kitchen counter. Now they have a “tableside bites chandelier,” a 15-foot pole that extends from the kitchen to serve diners at the central table. travailkitchen.com.

Eleven Madison Park, New York City
On Daniel Humm’s newly redesigned menu, sous-vide-cooked carrots are passed through a classic meat grinder tableside and served on toasted rye bread, with condiments like fresh grated horseradish. elevenmadisonpark.com.

Related: Best New Finger Foods
Dan Barber on Why You Should Put Down the Fork

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