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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Postcard From Stockholm

New Stockholm Restaurants Rethink Swedish Food

Ekstedt, Stockholm

Writer Stephen Whitlock extols sourdough waffles cooked over live fire, smoked-reindeer sandwiches and more proudly Swedish dishes.

Swedes and Danes have a long-standing and fierce rivalry. Over the centuries, they've fought countless wars, with Sweden generally viewed as the stronger imperial power. Yet, since Noma opened in 2003, Copenhagen has prevailed as Scandinavia's culinary destination, leaving Swedes to fume—and simultaneously try to score a table. Now, Stockholm is rediscovering its pride in its own culinary traditions, with new restaurants rethinking husmanskost—traditional Swedish food.

When Ekstedt (ekstedt.nu) opened in 2011, it was booked for months. Once I secured a reservation, I found a room furnished with copper that caught the light from wood-fired ovens. Dishes like mackerel with smoked parsley are wonderfully delicate, while sourdough waffles with cloudberries are gently sweet.

Oaxen (oaxen.com) looks to the present rather than the past. It recently moved from a remote island to a modern building in Stockholm, with a massive window overlooking the water. One of its dining rooms, Krog, offers a 10-course menu for $300. But I head for the more laid-back Slip. The menu is full of Swedish dishes: herring, lamb with carrot chutney. The best is a simple bowl of scrambled eggs served with pork belly and house-smoked bacon.

The most inventive of the new-comers is Smörgåstårteriet (smorgastarteriet.se). It takes its name from the "sandwich cake," made here with layers of sourdough bread, roast beef and pickled vegetables. It's a highlight on a menu that's a tour of Sweden: Other sandwiches use shrimp from the south and smoked reindeer from the far north.

Stockholm hasn't yet caught up to Copenhagen—the city has no rival to Noma yet—but here's hoping the Scandinavian food fight continues.

Stephen Whitlock lives in Stockholm and writes for the New York Times.

Related: Stockholm City Guide
Scandinavian Style

Follow Of The Week

From Vermont with Love

Instagram + Vermont + food + cats  = @careynotcarrie a.k.a Carey Nershi. The creator of the blog Reclaiming Provincial, Carey packs her Instagram feed with food and feline-filled photographs that have a soulful, rustic aesthetic. From her cantaloupe, basil and Lillet popsicles in a bowl of ice to her red bell pepper, lemon and basil sodas, Carey's photos make us wish we were right next to her in Burlington, Vermont.

Related: Maple Syrup
Where To Eat Now: Vermont Restaurants
Burlington, Vermont Peaks

F&W Photo Tour

A Local’s Guide to Copenhagen

Cinnamon Buns at Meyers Bakery

For an insider view of the world’s most beautiful and exciting travel destinations, F&W asked our favorite photographers on Tumblr to show us their cities.

F&W follows Pernille Zierau Larsen on Instagram and Tumblr for her black-and-white (or barely-colored) Copenhagen imagery. And for the pug shots. Larsen snaps her dog Woody in various situations, like riding in a bicycle basket staring at the road ahead, and slips those moments into a feed of graphic lifestyle pics. The result feels highly-curated and naturally Scandinavian. “To me, less is more,” she says. For aspiring photographers, she recommends focusing on one interesting element in the frame. “Things don’t necessarily have to be in the center—try shooting the same subject from different angles,” she adds. Click through Pernille’s F&W Photo Tour: Copenhagen. And, below, find her insider picks for the best cinnamon buns and Scandi shops in her city.

Favorite Copenhagen restaurants. Two things come to mind. The indie restaurant Manfreds & Vin for beef tartare with watercress and toasted rye bread. And the beautiful restaurant Mother, which serves the most delicious stone-oven-fired pizza: "Burning Love" with mozzarella, potatoes, fried onions and smoked pancetta.

Best Copenhagen bakeries. Meyers bakery has the best cinnamon buns. Brød bakery makes the most wonderful buns and chocolate croissants.

Essential Copenhagen coffee shops. Original Coffee is low-key, with a great interior and I always stop by for a flat white when I’m in the neighborhood. Riccos is right around the corner from my house, and the place I go for a latte to-go.

Go-to Copenhagen bars. Mexibar is a fun and quirky bar for old-school, colorful drinks. Malbeck Winebar is a beautiful, rustic wine bar with a nice selection of wines, especially reds, which are powerful and intense. Paté Paté is also great for wine—I like the Riesling Kung Fu Girl from Columbia Valley. Dyrehaven is a hip, young bar—ideal for a beer.

Beautiful Copenhagen shop. COS is a Scandinavian clothing line with simple, sleek and clean-cut lines. It’s classic, feels very high-end and the quality is great. I almost never leave the COS store empty handed.

Ultimate Copenhagen souvenir. I would invest in some Danish design, whether it be a graphic print to hang on your wall, a design object for decoration or some ceramics for the kitchen. Illums Bolighus and Stilleben are both great places to get items like this.

Related: F&W Photo Tour: Copenhagen
F&W Photo Tour: Berlin
F&W Photo Tour: Bandung, Indonesia

Blogger Spotlight

Naturally Ella’s Fastest Dinner Recipes and Tips for Food Bloggers

Erin Alderson, author of Naturally Ella

For her blog Naturally Ella, Erin Alderson writes about vegetarian foods; she also helps aspiring food bloggers design their own sites through her company Wooden Spoons Kitchen. Read more »

read more
Supermarket Sleuth

Baker's Delight

F&W food editors apply their incredible cooking knowledge to explaining what to do with a variety of interesting ingredients.

Baking with chocolate has come a long way since Etienne Guittard started his company in California nearly 150 years ago. Then, recipes simply called for chocolate; they didn’t even specify “dark,” as milk chocolate hadn’t been invented. Nowadays, recipes usually specify semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, and many are starting to call for chocolate with specific percentages of cacao. Guittard’s three new fair trade–certified bars , called the Collection Etienne, cover all the bases for bakers: There’s semisweet at 64 percent, bittersweet at 70 percent and unsweetened chocolate at 100 percent. All three offer deep, lush chocolate flavor, and the two-ounce bars, packed three to a box, are easy to snap off and use ($7 for six ounces). www.guittard.com/
If you need some inspiration, here are three of my favorite chocolate recipes:
Salted Fudge Brownies
Chocolate Soufflé Sundae
Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse with Cocoa Nib Whipped Cream

Related: Best Chocolate in the U.S.
Amazing Chocolate Cakes
Fast Chocolate Desserts

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Join celebrity chefs, renowned winemakers and epicurean insiders at the culinary world’s most spectacular weekend, the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.