Oft-cited as the progenitor of all booze, mead (a.k.a. honey wine) has been experiencing an artisanal revival in America, mostly thanks to a trio of excellent producers within spitting distance of one another in Michigan.

Spike Carter
December 02, 2014

Oft-cited as the progenitor of all booze, mead (a.k.a. honey wine) has been experiencing an artisanal revival in America, mostly thanks to a trio of excellent producers within spitting distance of one another in Michigan. Here, three sources for great mead to drink this fall.
 
Schramm’s Mead
Ken Schramm, whose The Compleat Meadmaker explains how to make mead at home, says the trend is nothing new for his area. “Michigan has been a hotbed for mead for more than 25 years,” he says. His universally lauded Heart of Darkness mead is a nicely balanced concoction flavored with his home-grown cherries, raspberries and black currants. schrammsmead.com
 
B. Nektar Meadery
“Michigan is one of the top honey-producing states, so it’s natural that great meads will also be created here,” says cofounder Brad Dahlhofer. B. Nektar makes an amazing session mead called Kill All the Golfers. It’s a low-alcohol, lightly fizzy, Arnold Palmer–inspired mead made with black tea and lemon juice. bnektar.com
 
Kuhnhenn Brewing Co.
The bold meads from this beer producer have attracted a following—fans line up for mazer (that’s someone who makes mead) Frank Retell’s small-batch releases. The most coveted is his Bourbon Barrel Banana French Toast mead, an aptly named boozy Proustian memory flood revered by anyone lucky enough to have scored a taste.

Related: Reinvented Classic Cocktails
Beautiful Cocktails
America's Best Bars

You May Like