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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Expert Lessons

The Best Way to Grill a Huge Piece of Meat

The Best Way to Grill a Huge Piece of Meat

No piece of meat is too large for the grill as long as you know how to butterfly it.

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Expert Guide

The Elite Meats of America: A Short List

There are no doubt dozens of incredible meat producers in America -- small farms, independent collectives, high-end branded puryeyors.

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America's Most Wanted

Michael Chiarello’s Cabernet-Smoked Short Ribs

“I like barbecue as much as the next guy, but sometimes it feels like you just licked an ashtray,” says Bottega chef Michael Chiarello.

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Easter

How to Cook 3 Supercheap and Insanely Delicious Cuts of Lamb

How to Cook 3 Supercheap and Insanely Delicious Cuts of Lamb

Lamb ribs, necks and leg steaks are cheaper and perhaps even more delicious than lamb chops and racks. Here, how to cook these bargain cuts.

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Know Your Meats

Meat Aging: The Great Debate

Meat Aging: The Great Debate

Dry aging, wet aging or no aging? The country's top steak chefs weigh in.

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Expert Guide

6 Meat Packaging Claims That Don’t Mean What You Think

Contrary to what some vegans believe, we meat lovers are not—at least not necessarily—indifferent to the evils of commercial meat production. We don’t sit around thinking of ways we can make pigs miserable. We want them to be happy, at least until we eat them. But the meat business, ever resourceful and pressed by hard times to sell more and more, has come up with a handful of claims with which to assure us. Some, like “organic beef,” have specific and rigorous qualifications. Others are largely bogus. For example: All Natural. This one is so vague that I wonder how I could ever have been convinced by it...Read more >

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Know Your Meats

The Most Delicious Cut of Pork You Never Heard Of

End-Cut Rib Pork Chops.

In this series, expert Josh Ozersky offers a guide to buying, cooking and eating meat, in particular those unusual and obscure cuts that are rarely seen in restaurants. 

The Cut: End-cut rib pork chops, as the name implies, are taken from the front end of the rib cage nearest to the animal’s shoulder. Their technical designation in the bible of the meat business, the National Association of Meat Producers guide, is #1410A rib chops.

The Sell: For most of my life, I had a conflicted relationship with pork chops. I loved their golden crescent edges, sickles of the purest and densest pork fat. I loved to gnaw on the bone, too, both for its rugged, toothsome gifts and also for the self-parodic aspects—comic props in the Josh Ozersky Show. However, in between the bone and that rim of lard, I generally found a featureless plain of dry and tasteless meat, a “food desert” if ever there was one.

One day I found some pork chops that had another layer of meat on top of the first; where the chop should have ended was a second thick slab of muscle that was better than the first. I couldn’t understand why this outer piece wasn’t the star of the show. It was like when Hendrix opened for The Monkees. I would later find out that this was none other than the porcine version of the deckle, that precious and obsessed over cap that sits atop rib eye beef steaks. (Rib steaks and rib chops are the same thing, but from different animals.) But whereas serious beef eaters have gotten the memo, pork enthusiasts have not. That ends here. The spinalis muscle’s unique combination of richness, tenderness and firmness outclasses any other muscle by an order of magnitude. And as a bonus, a kind of insider reward, the rhomboideus muscle comes on the bottom of the end cut. Top that, center loin pork chop!

The How-To: Pork chops, unless double cut, rarely achieve that ideal, robust, sizzling browning from a pan or grill. They overcook too fast; the surface buckles against the pan; open flames get one side but not the precious edge; and other misfortunes follow. So predictably, I think they should be fried.

Josh Ozersky has written on his carnivorous exploits for Time, Esquire and New York magazines; he has authored several books, including The Hamburger: A History; and he is the founder of the Meatopia food festival.

Related: 33 Pork Recipes
Best-Ever Recipes for Pork, Beef and Ribs
Best Shops for Cured Meats

Health

Can It Be True?

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Red meat is not having a great month. First pink slime. Now, a new study shows that all red meat is bad for your health, even the delicious unprocessed kind. Read more >

 

 

 

 

 

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.