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By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Grace in the Kitchen

Char Siu, Anyone?

© Christina Holmes

These crispy, sweet-and-spicy pork spareribs are a
hundred times better than Chinese takeout char siu ribs,
and they’re a good example of what’s so
great about using a pressure cooker.
© Christina Holmes

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

By now I probably sound like a broken record, and I’m not afraid to shout it out, but I love my pressure cooker! Tough cuts, like ribs, need a long time to get tender, but literally 15 minutes at pressure and these ribs are almost falling off the bone.

Char Siu Spareribs, those sticky, chewy ribs from Chinese restaurants, though delicious, frighten me with their nuclear-reactor-red food coloring. Mine hit all of the high points without the scary DNA-altering potential. I cut them into three-rib sections, marinate them in a mixture of hoisin, honey, ginger, soy and garlic, then pressure cook them for 15 minutes. Next the ribs get brushed with honey and broiled until browned and shiny. While they’re broiling, I boil the cooking liquid down to a sticky, spicy sauce to serve on the side. Maybe it’s faster than take out. Who knows? But it definitely is better and safer. SEE RECIPE »

Related: Takeout Classics
Fast Chinese Recipes
How to Find an Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Grace in the Kitchen

Superquick Posole

© Lucy Schaeffer
© Lucy Schaeffer

A mix of mild chiles (poblano, Anaheim) and hot
ones (serrano) gives body and heat to this quick
braise
made with boneless pork shoulder.
© Lucy Schaeffer

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

It’s rare that I get to develop recipes in the same season in which they’ll appear in the magazine. There’s lots of extrapolating about how great the dish would be if only we had good, seasonal…(tomatoes, corn, berries, peaches…).

Like broccoli, asparagus and zucchini, chiles are pretty good all year round. Of course, they’d be amazing fresh from the farmers’ market, but I'm pretty happy with what I can get at Whole Foods or Fairway. Especially for this delicious braised pork stew. The chiles—poblano, Anaheim and Serrano—are thinly sliced, and they melt into a silky sauce as the pork braises in the liquid. The heat is mild but it does build, so I sometimes stir in canned hominy or just serve it with rice and warm corn tortillas. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Pork Soups and Stews
Hearty Stews
F&W Editors' Favorite Pork Recipes

Grace in the Kitchen

Gnarly

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Spicy Cheddar Witch Fingers // © David Malosh

Come Halloween, shape cheesy crackers into creepy witch fingers,
pressing a sliced almond into each one to make the nail. // © David Malosh

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

Practically any recipe can be adapted for Halloween with just a few changes. Of course, changing the name is purely conceptual unless you make physical changes to match the name. I turned my favorite cheese coin recipe into perfectly ghoulish Halloween tidbits by rolling the dough into long cylinders, putting an almond “fingernail” at one end and calling them Spicy Cheddar Witch Fingers. SEE RECIPE »


Related: Spooky Halloween Recipes
Ghoulish Halloween Cocktails
Frightening Halloween Desserts

Grace in the Kitchen

Carbo-Load

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Flatbread Lasagna // © Tina Rupp

This decadent lasagna is made with pocketless pita or naan bread instead of traditional lasagna noodles. / © Tina Rupp

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

My husband's been on a low carb diet kick for several months now (he looks great!), and you'd think that we all would be dropping pounds, since I cook nearly all of the dinners. I'm not making tons of pasta these days, and rice or bread is always now an accompaniment. But I've got to say, I've been craving a great big plate of gooey baked pasta.

This flatbread "lasagna" is probably the most carb-y casserole I've ever made, but it's delightfully evil and, I think, worth the splurge. I developed this recipe for an old column of mine—Tasting and Testing—this particular one about using flatbreads in somewhat unexpected ways. Though I'd never seen anything like this, I'd imagined (when I was hatching ideas) that it would be as if bread pudding and baked ziti got together and made a flatbread lasagna baby.

Aside from not boiling noodles, I tried to make the dish as simple as possible. It calls for jarred marinara sauce (I love Rao's—it's convenient and delicious, but kind of expensive). At home, I always have several quart containers of homemade sauce in the freezer. I've only ever used plain naan or pocketless pita, but now that there are so many flavors, it might be time to try it with onion,  garlic, olive or whole grain.  A futile nod to the health conscious? I think not. In any case, it will certainly test my husband's resolve. Never a saboteur, maybe I'll wait until he's reintroduced bread to his diet or maybe just until he's out for the night. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Gooey Casseroles
Fantastic Baked Pasta Dishes
Terrific Lasagnas

Grace in the Kitchen

Spicy-Sweet Southwestern Summer Salad

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Chipotle-Corn Salad // © Kristen Strecker

The chipotle chiles for this spicy fresh-corn salad are available in the Latin section of big supermarkets around the country. / © Kristen Strecker

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

We sometimes joke in the kitchen that a particular chef whom I adore, uses the same three ingredients (often in the same dish) over and over and over: honey, lime and chipotle. Yeah, it's a magical combination, and one I've used often enough, so I can't really get too snarky. In this  dish, though, I've allowed the grilled corn and vidalia onions to be the only source of sweetness. It's balanced by the tartness of the lime and the heat of the chipotles is smoothed out by the sour cream. I love it alongside a smoky charred rib eye or even grilled salmon. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Corn Recipes
Southwestern and Tex-Mex Dishes
Grilled Corn Recipes

Supermarket Sleuth

3 Tasty Ways to Flavor Edamame

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Indian-Spiced Edamame // © James Baigrie

Give healthy, protein-packed edamame a flavor
boost with different sauces and spices.
© James Baigrie

F&W Executive Food Editor Tina Ujlaki applies her incredible cooking knowledge to explaining what to do with a variety of interesting ingredients.

A little light went off the first time I tried Daniel Orr’s olive-oil-and-spice–tossed edamame recipe, and I haven’t eaten a plain pod since. The genius lies in the fact that to get to the beans, you have to sort of bite them out of the pods anyway, so why not add flavor to suit your mood. Some of my favorite iterations include olive oil and curry powder, soy sauce and toasted sesame oil, and cumin, roasted pumpkin seed oil and lime.

 

Related: More Healthy Snacks
Healthy Asian Recipes
Fantastic Recipes Using Beans

Grace in the Kitchen

Peck of Pickled Beans

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Horseradish-Pickled Wax Beans/ © Petrina Tinslay

These quick pickles require no heat—just shake the ingredients for the brine together and pour them over raw wax beans. / © Petrina Tinslay

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

A quick trip to the farmers' market yielded a big bag of mixed green and yellow wax beans—also some broad Romano beans, which I promptly turned into these gorgeous quick pickles. All I served them with the next day was a fresh, crusty baguette, lots of unsalted butter, sliced radishes and a good sprinkling of coarse sea salt. Divine! SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Pickled Vegetables
Delicious Green Beans
F&W Editors' Favorite Vegetable Recipes

Grace in the Kitchen

Another Cool Use for Pound Cake

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Blueberry Pound Cake Crisp // © Lucy Schaeffer

Delicious, sugary cubes of pound cake make for a great topping on this baked fruit dessert. // © Lucy Schaeffer

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

What's the difference between a crisp and crumble? And what the hell are Buckles, Grunts and Bettys, exactly? Maybe this clears it up? Whatever the case may be, I don't think this recipe's title is entirely accurate, because pound cake is not a traditional baked-fruit topping. But it is fast, easy and entirely delicious. Here, toasted, sugared cubes of pound cake (lemon-yogurt might just be the perfect choice) cover a steaming, bubbling dish of tart blueberries. Plums, nectarines, peaches, berries, rhubarb, pears, etc., would also do terrifically, especially when served with ginger, coconut, cinnamon or plain old vanilla ice cream. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Fruit Cobblers and Crisps
Amazing Fruit Desserts
Recipes with Blueberries

Grace in the Kitchen

Semifreddo: Low-Tech Ice Cream

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Lemon-Honey Semifreddo // © Hallie Burton

This restaurant-inspired frozen mousse is an easy-to-make alternative to ice cream. / © Hallie Burton

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

I remember thinking how fancy those soft, cakey lady fingers were. My mom would have them in the freezer waiting to be put to good use: Zuppa Inglese (English Trifle, Italian style), cheesecake edges, ice cream bombes…yum! I've put them inside a very light and lemony frozen dessert called semifreddo, which is easier and more elegant than ice cream because it's served in slices. You see the lovely cross-sections—like an inside-out ice cream cake. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Frozen Desserts
Recipes with Honey
Italian-American Classics

Grace in the Kitchen

Healthy & Delicious From the Farmers' Market

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Braised Greens with Tomatoes // © James Baigrie

This fast dish combines antioxidant-packed dark, leafy greens and lypocene-rich grape tomatoes. / © James Baigrie

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

Sometimes I could eat nothing for dinner but a mess of greens. Unfortunately, my family requires protein and a starch. But on the rare occasion when I'm alone (four weeks each summer when the kids are at camp and eating camp food—which is one step above hospital food—I can indulge in the opposite of indulgence. SEE RECIPE »

Related: More Greens Recipes
Vegetable Side Dishes
30-Minute Sides

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

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