How Rosé Wine is Made

Almost every wine region in the world makes rosé—and not one uses pink grapes.

Almost every wine region in the world makes rosé—and not one uses pink grapes. Some vintners simply blend red and white wines; others, in an effort to make their red wine more concentrated, bleed off some juice to simultaneously make rosé. The best versions, however, involve leaving red-grape juice in tanks with the grape skins for anywhere from a few hours to several days. The longer the juice is left with 
the skins, the deeper the color (from a hint of pink or salmon to a hot pink or ruby hue) and the more full-bodied the wine.

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