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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Grace in the Kitchen

No More Stinky Kitchens

© Lucy Schaeffer

Poaching salmon in wine gives it a lovely flavor; using the poaching liquid
to make a vinaigrette is a delicious way to dress the salad. © Lucy Schaeffer

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

I love salmon, but cooking it indoors is not something I ever do at home—frankly, I don't even like cooking it at work and then having to get on the subway smelling like low tide. Grilling (outside) is acceptable, poaching (inside) even better.

The poaching liquid traps the smell and keeps the fish incredibly moist. A full-bodied, semidry Riesling is my choice here because it’s strong enough to stand up to salmon without overpowering it. I whisked a few tablespoons of the poaching liquid into mayonnaise and horseradish to make a piquant, creamy dressing, and tossed it with crunchy tender escarole leaves, butter beans and, of course, the yummy salmon. I would save the remainder of the bottle of Riesling for another day and serve a bright, citrusy Sauvignon Blanc at dinner. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

An American Classic, Italian-style

© Christina Holmes

This is a stellar combination of juicy roast beef with bitter broccoli
rabe and melty provolone cheese. © Christina Holmes

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

Never have nine ingredients come together to make my mouth water as much as the ones in this crazy-good, Italian grilled-cheese sandwich. Olive oil-sautéed bitter broccoli rabe, anchovies, garlic, crushed red pepper, roast beef, sweet-spicy Peppadew peppers, provolone and crusty bread are all pressed together to make a gooey, crunchy mess. For me, it honestly doesn’t get better. If I’m rushed, I don’t even blanch the broccoli rabe before sautéing it. All good, since I love bitter flavors. I can feel my salivary glands getting a bit active! SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Grains: My Secret Weapon

© Kana Okada.

Barley is served at room temperature in this terrific salad with walnuts,
parsley and salty bits of ricotta salata cheese in a lemon-garlic
vinaigrette. © Kana Okada.

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

My Diet Secret: Well, it may be no great revelation, but once I started adding whole grains to my diet at every meal, I began to trim down, have better energy and actually lowered my cholesterol. I (mistakenly) thought that as a distance runner, I could eat whatever I wanted whenever I wanted with impunity. But slowly the weight crept up, as did my cholesterol, at an inverse relation to my energy level. Yeah, aging has a lot to do with it, but that’s all the more reason to be a bit more diligent. I’m not fanatical, though. I eat cake and candy and meat and dairy and butter, but not a lot and not often.

For this salad, I picked ingredients that are: A. easy to find; B. delicious; C. and pack a tremendous health punch. Walnuts are probably the healthiest nuts, with high levels of omega-3, antioxidants and fiber; parsley is high in anti-inflammatories and vitamin K, which is believed to help prevent cardiovascular disease. And the ricotta salata adds a bit of lean protein richness. Without getting preachy—because nothing’s more annoying than an overly zealous reformed anything—making a big batch of grain salad and eating it over the course of a few days is a real game changer. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

YouTube-Inspired Cooking

Crunchy Pork Kimchi Burgers // © Lucas Allen

These pork-and-kimchi patties make great burgers, especially with
bread-and-butter pickles. © Lucas Allen

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

YouTube cooking videos can be pretty addictive—especially the stupid ones. I can sit for hours and jump from one to another. Sometimes, though, I actually learn something. This particular video from Maangchi—definitely not one of the stupid ones; just really, really fun!—shows how to make two kinds of kimchi pancakes. The recipe toward the end of the video inspired my pork and kimchi burger recipe.

In the video, she makes this simple paste of minced pork, tofu and seasonings and spreads it on whole kimchi leaves, which get batter-dipped and fried. Too bad it’s not that easy to find whole-leaf kimchi. I like recipe for its simplicity and accessibility, while still maintaining authentic Korean flavors. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Superflavorful Sausage-Stuffed Peppers

Making stuffed peppers with sausage instead of ground meat adds a great kick of flavor. // © Quentin Bacon
© Quentin Bacon

Making stuffed peppers with sausage instead of
ground meat adds a great kick of flavor. // © Quentin Bacon

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

I don’t think I’d have become a cook if it weren’t for my mom and all of the great food I was exposed to growing up with her. This recipe was part of a story about reinventing some classic Italian American dishes that my mom prepared throughout my childhood. For the story, I developed the recipes, then sent her copies and ingredients to try them out herself and report back on her findings. It was a huge success and loads of fun—she liked them all. You can read her comments online. It will be just more than a year since this recipe was published and nearly a year since my mom passed away, so it’s pretty sad to look at and remember. It’s silly to honor her memory with stuffed peppers, but she really did like them and she really was proud of being a part of the Food & Wine team and proud of me. Though I don’t know if I’ll be able to cook any of these recipes anytime soon, as delicious as they were. SEE RECIPE »

Grace in the Kitchen

Microwave Magic

© Jonny Valiant
© Jonny Valiant

Instead of croutons, consider making these crisp little chorizo
bites to crunch up your salad. © Jonny Valiant

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

Before I had kids, I would never have owned a microwave. It was almost a point of pride that I didn't have one—so bourgeois. Cold coffee would've been poured down the drain and a fresh cup brewed—ah, the indulgences of single living—but now it's indispensable in the kitchen. Baked potatoes can be an afterthought, as can toasting nuts or melting butter. However, I do still finish off the potatoes in a toaster oven for five minutes to crisp the skin. And don't forget the obvious tasks that required lots of gas, electricity and time, like rewarming leftovers and sterilizing manky dish sponges. Mmm.

Recently, I've even used the microwave for more ambitious things, like making beef jerky and homemade vegetable crisps and chorizo chips, which are a crunchy cross between bacon bits and croutons. I've even crumbled the crispy chips and folded them into softened butter, which is amazing on baked potatoes (thank you, microwave X2) or pasta or spreading on crusty bread. They're pretty awesome in salads, which may be my favorite use, because they're salty, meaty and crunchy—and, because the fat has been completely rendered, they're surprisingly lean. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Char Siu, Anyone?

© Christina Holmes

These crispy, sweet-and-spicy pork spareribs are a
hundred times better than Chinese takeout char siu ribs,
and they’re a good example of what’s so
great about using a pressure cooker.
© Christina Holmes

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

By now I probably sound like a broken record, and I’m not afraid to shout it out, but I love my pressure cooker! Tough cuts, like ribs, need a long time to get tender, but literally 15 minutes at pressure and these ribs are almost falling off the bone.

Char Siu Spareribs, those sticky, chewy ribs from Chinese restaurants, though delicious, frighten me with their nuclear-reactor-red food coloring. Mine hit all of the high points without the scary DNA-altering potential. I cut them into three-rib sections, marinate them in a mixture of hoisin, honey, ginger, soy and garlic, then pressure cook them for 15 minutes. Next the ribs get brushed with honey and broiled until browned and shiny. While they’re broiling, I boil the cooking liquid down to a sticky, spicy sauce to serve on the side. Maybe it’s faster than take out. Who knows? But it definitely is better and safer. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Superquick Posole

© Lucy Schaeffer
© Lucy Schaeffer

A mix of mild chiles (poblano, Anaheim) and hot
ones (serrano) gives body and heat to this quick
braise
made with boneless pork shoulder.
© Lucy Schaeffer

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

It’s rare that I get to develop recipes in the same season in which they’ll appear in the magazine. There’s lots of extrapolating about how great the dish would be if only we had good, seasonal…(tomatoes, corn, berries, peaches…).

Like broccoli, asparagus and zucchini, chiles are pretty good all year round. Of course, they’d be amazing fresh from the farmers’ market, but I'm pretty happy with what I can get at Whole Foods or Fairway. Especially for this delicious braised pork stew. The chiles—poblano, Anaheim and Serrano—are thinly sliced, and they melt into a silky sauce as the pork braises in the liquid. The heat is mild but it does build, so I sometimes stir in canned hominy or just serve it with rice and warm corn tortillas. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Senegalese Penicillin

© Stephanie Foley

The base for this West African Chicken Soup is a
deeply flavorful chicken broth.
© Stephanie Foley

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

Straight-up chicken soup is supposed to be some sort of panacea that people swear by, but it doesn’t work on me. I might do better with ramen, minestrone or pho. Maybe those soups, with all of their complexities could temporarily distract me from feeling crummy. But I’d rather just listen to music. Nothing lifts my spirits like African dance music with great percussion and horn sections. Three of my favorites are Touré Kunda and Orchestra Baobab from Senegal, and Fela Kuti from Nigeria. Their names alone are uplifting. I do like chicken soup, but not for it’s curative promises. It’s a blank canvas onto which you can throw all sorts of interesting colors.

This version uses flavors of West Africa—ginger, curry, coconut milk and banana. Though I can’t dance while I'm eating the soup, I certainly can while I prepare it. And therein lies (my) cure. SEE RECIPE »

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Grace in the Kitchen

Coke, No Pepsi

© Yunhee Kim

Greeks make souvlaki by marinating chunks of meat in oil, lemon juice
and oregano, then skewering and grilling them. This version uses
pork shoulder because it's so tender and succulent. © Yunhee Kim

Food & Wine's senior recipe developer, Grace Parisi, is a Test Kitchen superstar. In this series, she shares some of her favorite recipes to make right now.

It was sort of a revelation to me that you could quickly cook pork shoulder. I’d always assumed that it needed hours of slow braising or roasting to get the meat meltingly tender. But then I remembered (vaguely) a recipe for spareribs that were high-heat roasted for a relatively short time. They were a bit chewy, yeah, but still juicy and really meaty. The little bit of fat self-bastes and helps caramelize the meat. It occurred to me that I could use shoulder in a whole host of recipes that seemed destined for quicker-cooking pork loin or, even worse, tenderloin.

The key is (and this is probably totally obvious, but...) cutting the meat into small pieces. For this souvlaki, I cut the pork into 1/2-by-3-inch strips and let it marinate with onions, lemon, herbs, salt and pepper for about 10 minutes. Maybe the salt and acid help to tenderize the meat? I don’t know, but they do infuse a bit of flavor, which is important in something that cooks quickly. I heated a cast-iron griddle until smoking hot, and cooked the meat and onions until tender and charred in spots. (Think short-order cook at your favorite Greek place.) I’m kind of addicted to Fabulous Flats Tandoori Naan, which is really just a pocketless pita. It makes the best wrap for this souvlaki, but any brand will do. Do not forget the tzatziki—it keeps everything deliciously creamy and rich! SEE RECIPE »

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