My F&W
quick save (...)

Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

RSS
Style Find

How to Work Neon at Home

default-image
Neon Laguiole Pocketknife

Laguiole Pocketknife Photo Courtesy of Sid Mashburn

Once relegated to highlighters and ’80s flashbacks, neon is having a sophisticated moment. Fluorescent pinks, greens and yellows are turning up on everything from nail polish to home decor. Paris-based housewares line Adónde makes neon look elegant by contrasting the Day-Glo shades with more natural materials. The company's eco-friendly Octa wastepaper baskets are inspired by geometric shapes like the polyhedron and made of recycled cardboard.

“Maybe the reason that neon is so popular now is for the same reason that we love using it—people like more natural colors, but they need a little twist to it, a touch of modernity,” says Adónde cofounder Laurent Serin. “We are kind of obsessed with neon pink,” adds cofounder Javier Gutierrez Carcache. Their favorite color also turns up on three-piece vases made of alder wood and French stoneware. Here, a variety of neon-accented items so you can experiment with the trend at home.
 
SHOPPING GUIDE

Laguiole has recreated its famous pocketknife in a neon-yellow hue (above). sidmashburn.com

Neon Salt and Pepper Shakers

Courtesy of La Tête au Cube.

 

 

 

Fluo porcelain salt and pepper shakers are handmade in Limoges, France, and come in bright yellow, orange and green. lateteaucube.com

Neon Throw Pillows

Courtesy of Shop Ten 25

 

 

 Gray linen pillows have just a thin border of Bold Orchid or Limeade piping. shopten25.com

Tart Server

Courtesy of Leif

 

 

This elegant acrylic tart server comes in 14 different colors, including Bright Fuchsia and Valencia, a vibrant red. leifshop.com

Style

Lulu DK's Nature-Inspired Design

default-image
Lulu deKwiatkowski

Courtesy of LULU DK

 

 

With her latest eye-catching designs, Lulu deKwiatkowski is decorating the world with butterflies, flowers and peacocks.

Read more >

read more
Fresh Design

Color-Blocked Utensils

default-image

Photo: Ryan Liebe for Milk Farm Road

It’s no surprise that, in the era of glamorous cooking shows and celebrity chefs, fashion trends get translated into cookware. Color-blocked apparel was all over the runways and in stores last fall, and you can now find this kind of graphic design in housewares as well. See F&W's shopping guide >

read more
Design

Pinterest Style Picks

default-image

Pinterest is a social networking site for the visually inclined: Users bookmark web images, creating digital mood boards. Former F&W style editor Jessica Romm shares hers.

read more
Chefs

Haute Chef Style

default-image

 

Gone are the days of sauce-splattered chefs hiding out in closed-door kitchens: With more restaurants embracing open-kitchen layouts, the chef is often as much on display as the food. On December 4 at Mercury Lounge in San Francisco, Fog City Diner executive chef and menswear designer Daniel Sudar launches his new Beyond Chef Wear line, fusing style and function for chef coats made from eco-friendly bamboo and cotton. Chef Alex Ong at Betelnut Restaurant and pastry chef Mitch Blanco at Zuni Cafe have already placed orders; Celebrity chef Art Smith and his husband are fans as well, and wore custom-tailored Daniel Sudar suits at their wedding last August. "I always want to be able to look good in my uniform," says Sudar.


Style

Ivanka Trump's Style Picks

default-image

Ivanka Trump

© Courtesy of Trump SoHo New York
Ivanka Trump

The November issue checks in on some of America's most revered food and wine families—not the matriarchs and patriarchs, but the children who are chefs, winemakers, and tastemakers doing incredible things in their own right. In this sneak peek, we take a closer look at Ivanka Trump's impeccable sense of style.

From lobby design to staff uniforms, Ivanka Trump is deeply involved in the look of the Trump Hotel Collection, which recently expanded abroad with a new hotel in Panama and one on the way in Toronto—to open early next year. The real-estate heir shares style favorites:


Ivanka Trump's Style Picks

© Seth Smoot / Megan Martin
Ivanka Trump's Style Picks

Architecture Bible At over 800 pages, The Phaidon Atlas of Contemporary World Architecture surveys 1,000 of the greatest buildings in the world. "It often inspires my design projects," says Trump. $100; amazon.com.

Weekly Blossoms H. Bloom delivers bouquets in a growing number of US cities. From $29 a week; hbloom.com.


Ivanka Trump's Style Picks

© Seth Smoot / Seth Smoot / Fornasetti
Ivanka Trump's Style Picks

Modern Bundt The swooping pan is based on a German stoneware mold for kugelhopf cake. $34; williams-sonoma.com.

Scented Candle "My hair and makeup artist Alexa Rodulfo produces one called Bois Blanc." $35; alexarodulfo.com.

Italian Imagery A set of Fornasetti's handmade Themes and Variations plates hangs in Trump's kitchen. $195 each; unicahome.com.


Related:
Dining Room Style Splurges and Steals
New Gallic Design in America
Sleek Kitchen Makeovers

Books

Michael S. Smith’s Kitchen Decorating Tips

default-image

Interior designer to the Obamas at the White House, Michael S. Smith, will release his third book next month: Kitchens & Baths. In it, Smith shares design inspiration for "the busiest and most personal rooms in the home." For a sneak preview, we asked Smith for his top kitchen decorating tips.

Kitchens and Baths

© Courtesy Rizzoli New York

What are some easy ways to update your kitchen?
I think paint is the number one thing. If you have a kitchen that can be repainted, you can do that yourself. You can paint the ceiling a beautiful color. It's a bit more work, but if you have a wood floor, you can stain it, either in a pattern or one color. And many stores sell inexpensive hardware that you can install yourself, or you could change out the front of your cabinets.

How do you optimize space in a small kitchen?
Think about what you really need. If you live in an apartment and have a small kitchen, but don't cook that often, maybe refrigerator drawers instead of a whole refrigerator would be best. Make it charming and utilitarian. Like a boat: very efficient with no space left unused.

How do you approach giant kitchens?
Big kitchens tend to be filled with too much. Do you need a huge refrigeration space? I'd rather have a great bookcase with glass doors to store and protect cookbooks. Or a great niche with a sofa and ottoman so someone can hang out and talk with you while you cook.

What's your favorite kitchen trend?
Reusing things: refurbished stoves, old St. Charles cabinets, and lighting being reused. It is great environmentally and it gives the space charm.

What design elements are you obsessed with?
I really am obsessed with countertops. I think there are so many good options. People get into really expensive marbles. There are some pretty and really inexpensive stones, though keep in mind care issues. Butcher blocks can be inexpensive. CaesarStone is impervious to stains and is terrific. In my own kitchen, I have zinc countertops.

What are some kitchen decorating mistakes?
Trying to give your kitchen an entirely different look than the rest of the house—like if you walk into a fairly traditional house and the kitchen is Tuscan-style, and filled with sunflowers. That's wacky. Know what your house is like and what works. The things that come out of the kitchen, the food and conversations and all of those things matter—the look is important and should be attractive and cheerful.

More Kitchen Design Ideas:
Six Ways to Personalize a Kitchen
F&W Editors Kitchen Wish List
Food Bloggers' Best Kitchen Design Ideas

Menus

A Menu Edward Scissorhands Would Love

default-image

Tim Burton (American, b. 1958), Untitled (Edward Scissorhands), 1990, Pen and ink, and pencil on paper, 14 1/4 x 9" (36.2 x 22.9 cm), Private Collection

© Twentieth Century Fox, © 2011 Tim Burton
Tim Burton (American, b. 1958), Untitled (Edward Scissorhands), 1990, Pen and ink, and pencil on paper, 14 1/4 x 9" (36.2 x 22.9 cm), Private Collection


As I reported a few weeks back, museum restaurants are undergoing a new wave of innovation—a happy trend for those equally obsessed with food and art, like the amazing trendsetters we profile in our September 2011 issue. In Los Angeles, chef Kris Morningstar geeks out on the chance to get creative with the menu at Ray’s & Stark Bar, the new Renzo Piano–designed restaurant at the L.A. County Museum of Art. For the current Tim Burton exhibition, Morningstar consulted with the famously kooky director to develop menu specials like White Rabbit with Tea in a Mushroom Forest, a bacon-wrapped saddle of rabbit with chanterelle mushrooms and pistachio crumble. “Our goal is not to be pretentious,” says Morningstar, “but we felt that, for Tim Burton, the menu should be a little bit off the wall.” The Burton classic Edward Scissorhands (my personal favorite) meets its culinary counterpart in a dish of razor clams (ha ha) and burnt octopus in squid-olive broth, garnished with a trimmed “hedge” of fresh herbs. If you need a cocktail to get into the macabre mood, try the Dr. Burton at Stark Bar: The rum-and-amaro-based concoction evokes the flavors of Burton’s favorite soda, Dr Pepper. The specials will be available through the exhibition’s close on Halloween. Next up: architecture-inspired plates to celebrate the upcoming California Design exhibit this fall.

Entertaining

Wine Bottles Reincarnated

default-image

Wine bottle tumblers from BottleHood.

© Leslie Tiano
Wine bottle tumblers from BottleHood.

 

The other day at the beach, I came across a supercool beer bottle neck that had been so polished down by the waves and sand that it could be worn as a ring. It got me thinking about the many other neat ways to repurpose wine and beer bottles that I've seen lately. Atlanta-based Kathleen Plate transforms recycled glass into jewelry with clean, sleek lines—her new pale-blue chandelier necklace looks like the summer sky to me. The fire escape gardener in me appreciates the compact Grow Bottle, an indoor herb planter crafted from reclaimed restaurant wine bottles. And colored wine bottles look great on the tabletop even long after the last drop has been poured: In San Diego, BottleHood recrafts wine, beer and spirit bottles into unique glassware, from frat-house-ready Red Stripe glasses to funky-elegant green glass tumblers. Its glassware would be perfect on a casual summer table—along with a chilled summer bottle that's still full, of course.

Beer

Things To Do At A Restaurant—Besides Eat

default-image

If there’s one thing I want to do in a restaurant, it’s eat something amazing. But if I get to eat something good and beat my friend at ping pong, well then things are going really well for me. Happily, there’s a whole new world of restaurants that decided to take the Dave & Busters concept to another level, combining great food with superfun extracurricular activities.
 
Fly Fishing at the Restaurant at the Little Nell, Aspen – The hotel hasn’t actually installed a river in the middle of their dining room. But they do take guests out for a fly-fishing lesson and chef Robert McCormick will serve a waterside lunch on fine china, along the lines of salmon crostini and housemade ice cream sandwiches.  Starting this summer, they’ll make trips in a gorgeous new made-in-Montana wooden boat. thelittlenell.com
 
Surfing at Casa del Mar, Santa Monica – The name, Surf with Chef, says everything you need to know. You get a surf lesson with a private instructor and chef Jason Bowlin (chef at the hotel’s Catch restaurant; let’s assume he’s a good surfer); then Bowlin will slide in and serve lunch made with ingredients you’ve caught…. No! from the nearby farmer’s market, where he’ll make dishes like roasted beets with burrata. hotelcasadelmar.com
 
Rocking out at Sam’s, Boston – Sam’s co-owner, guitarist Drew Parsons (of American HiFi) often plays live sets on Friday nights at the restaurant. Extra credit to Sam’s: they also have a bocce court where groups can compete and sample dishes like black pepper patty burgers, and drink a Captain Hilt, a mix of bourbon, chartreuse and raspberry puree. samsatlouis.com
 
Ping-Ponging at Beekman Beer Garden Beach Club, NYC – Down at South Street Seaport, chef Jason Mayer serves German bratwurst on a pretzel bun (also hand-stretched pretzel snacks and cinnamon-sugar pretzels for dessert). There’s live music (George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at the end of July!) and a rec room dream assortment of ping pong, foosball and pool. beekmanbeergarden.com
 
Related Links
 
America’s Wacky Fair Foods
 
America’s Weirdest Regional Foods
 
American Beer, Bourbon and More

World’s Weirdest Restaurants
 
World’s Top 10 Life-Changing Restaurants

advertisement
The Dish
Receive delicious recipes and smart wine advice 4x per week in this e-newsletter.
The Wine List Weekly pairing plus best bottles to buy.
F&W Daily One sensational dish served fresh every day.
American Express Publishing ("AEP") may use your email address to send you account updates and offers that may interest you. To learn more about the ways we may use your email address and about your privacy choices, read the AEP Privacy Statement.
How we use your email address
advertisement
Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.