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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Recipes

Stephanie Izard's Mouthwatering Bread Salad

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause cravings, lip-smacking and an unshakeable desire to cook.

Artichoke and Strawberry Panzanella

This week, the F&W Test Kitchen excitedly tested recipes from Stephanie Izard's forthcoming cookbook, Girl in the Kitchen. An F&W Best New Chef 2011 and champion of Bravo’s Top Chef Season 4, Izard serves this popular Artichoke and Strawberry Panzanella at her Chicago restaurant, Girl & The Goat. The seemingly wild combination of braised artichokes, thinly sliced strawberries, crispy ciabatta cubes and basil happens to be extremely delicious—especially when tossed with a garlicky-lemon dressing and served on a hefty slice of fresh mozzarella. Chronicle Books will release the book in November, but F&W has lots of bread salad recipes for a fall supper like an Artichoke Panzanella with Tangy Roasted Chicken Thighs.

Recipes

Garlicky Chicken Thighs from The Chew’s Missing Mario Batali

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Garlicky Chicken Thighs

© Lucy Schaeffer
Garlicky Chicken Thighs

ABC’s new food-centric chat show, The Chew, premiered this afternoon. Highlights included Michael Symon showing off his “Got Pork” tattoo, Carla Hall’s 40-year-old Betty Crocker pancake recipe and Daphne Oz’s budget-friendly smoothie recipes (plus a visit from her famous Dr. dad). Noticeably absent from the studio was Mario Batali, who appeared later telecast from a charity golf tournament. Off-site location aside, Batali still managed to whip up a pizza. Here’s hoping the clog-clad chef will be more present in future episodes since we love his affordable recipes, like this one for grilled chicken thighs coated in a crispy, garlicky crumb topping.

Recipes

Ferran Adrià's Catalan Chicken Shortcut

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Catalan Rotisserie Chicken Stew

© Quentin Bacon
Catalan Rotisserie Chicken Stew

Known for experimenting with futuristic cooking techniques at the now-closed El Bulli, Spanish chef Ferran Adrià shows a simpler side in his next cookbook, The Family Meal. Focusing on the sort of filling budget meals that were served to the restaurant’s staff, the Phaidon tome drops October 1 and features step-by-step photo instructions. It's not the first time that Adrià has exhibited a knack for easy dishes; the superchef shared this recipe for sweet and nutty Catalan chicken stew with Food & Wine back in 2005. The surprising shortcut: store-bought rotisserie chicken.

Recipes

The Meatball Shop Cookbook

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause cravings, lip-smacking, and an unshakeable desire to cook.

Mini Buffalo Chicken Balls
This week in the F&W Test Kitchen we immersed ourselves in a new book from The Meatball Shop in NYC. Aside from being absolutely stunning, it’s full of casual, delectable recipes, including the super-clever Mini Buffalo Chicken Balls seen here. These phenomenal little bites were perfectly spicy and served with homemade blue cheese dressing and celery. Ballantine Books will release The Meatball Shop Cookbook, by Daniel Holzman and Michael Chernow, in November, but to experiment with the same flavors now, here's a great weekend recipe for Baked Buffalo Chicken Wings.

 

Recipes

Classic Twist Doughnuts

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Warning: Test Kitchen Tease snapshots may cause cravings, lip-smacking and an unshakeable desire to cook.

Classic Twists Donuts

Each year we test hundreds of cookbooks in the F&W Test Kitchen. This week we mixed, baked and fried our way through the new one from Seattle’s infamous Top Pot: Top Pot Hand-Forged Doughnuts: Secrets and Recipes for the Home Baker, by brothers Mark and Michael Klebeck. The classic twists seen here, with and without glaze, had a deliciously yeasty dough seasoned with a hint of mace and were fried just like your granny used to do it—in a vat of superhot oil. Chronicle Books will release the tome on September 21, but in the meantime, here are some fantastic doughnut recipes (both baked and fried) from the F&W archives.

Books

Bookstores for Food Lovers

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The September issue reveals some of the best new shops for food-obsessed readers.

Heirloom Book Company in Charleston, SC

© Courtesy of Heirloom Book Company/Photo by Andrew Stephen Cebulka
Heirloom Book Company in Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC: Heirloom Book Company
For people who want to eat their food and read about it too, this new shop has books on food and wine and out-of-print cookbooks, alongside antique kitchen tools and seeds from local chef Sean Brock of McCrady's. After-hours, the homey Heirloom hosts small in-store dinners cooked by chefs from all around the South.

London: V&A Reading Rooms
This stand-alone shop run by the Victoria and Albert Museum lures in readers with its books on design and art. It gets them to stay with a small menu of snacks (olives, lemon almonds) and organic wines chosen by Duncan Ackery to drink while (carefully) perusing the stacks.

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Healthy Italian Recipes from Cookbook Author Jessica Theroux

Recipes

Popeye-Inspired Chicken Should Not Affect Hair Growth

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Chicken Dance spotlights a fantastic Food & Wine chicken recipe every day.

Chicken with Olive, Capers and Roasted Lemons

© Tina Rupp

A British publisher will release The Popeye Cookbook in October—a health-focused tome featuring plenty of spinach and olive oil to celebrate the sailor and his gangly paramour, Olive Oyl. “These recipes are meant to build you up, give you hair on your chest and immediate strength,” the firm’s marketing director told The Guardian this week. As appealing as that sounds, you will not wake up with extra fur after making this healthy recipe for Sautéed Chicken with Olives, Capers and Roasted Lemons, served with baby spinach.

Books

How to Make Money from Your Cookbook Shelf

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We know, this sounds suspiciously like an internet ad that tells you how to make money by selling prescription drugs online. No, this might be even easier. Some cookbooks that you just might have sitting on your shelves are going for quite a bit of money on Amazon.
 
We’re not talking about super-specialized books like Modernist Cuisine, the recently released, $625, 46-pound compendium by Nathan Myhrvold, nor a first-edition copy of Elizabeth David’s A Book of Mediterranean Food, which went for $1583. (Although if you have either of those books on hand, you’re lucky, and potentially rich.) We’re talking specifically about The Last Course, by pastry goddess Claudia Fleming. Published in 2001, the book ranks just above the 783,000 mark on Amazon’s best-seller list and originally cost $40.  Now, a first edition of The Last Course is on sale for $800 on Amazon, with used copies going for $142.
 
Why is the book, as good as it is, so expensive? Because it was only reprinted in limited quantities. (Maybe also because gilttaste.com marked the book at $400 when Dave Chang recently named it on his curated cookbook list for the website.)
 
“People always want what they can’t get,” says The Last Course’s co-author, Melissa Clark. “Once a cookbook goes from utilitarian—as in, something to cook from—to cult—as in, something to own—that’s when you get crazy prices. The funny thing is, I recently bought a copy at a thrift shop for $20. Then the price skyrocketed. So now I have two copies, and I’m wishing I’d saved more from my original case of books.” Alright everyone, go check your shelves for The Last Course. Of course we recommend that you cook from it. But whatever you do, don’t put it on the giveaway pile. 
 
Related Links
 
Amazing David Chang Recipes

10 Recipes from Cookbook Legends

Best Cookbook Authors’ Best Recipes

15 Cheap and Delicious Recipes

Great Cookbook Gifts

Cookbooks

Jonathan Waxman's Way

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Swordfish Carpaccio

© Chris Quinlan
Swordfish Carpaccio

In our July issue, Frank Bruni wrote a great piece about cooking from chef Jonathan Waxman’s new book, Italian, My Way. I was fortunate enough to experience the book with much less effort than Bruni put in—Waxman cooked from it Monday night at the fantastic Frasca Food and Wine in Boulder, Colorado, as part of their Monday Night Wine Dinner series. Italian winemaker Giampaolo Venica poured some of his hyper-aromatic, unoaked whites, like the Venica & Venica 2010 Sauvignon Blanc Ronco delle Mele, with Waxman’s dishes.

© Chris Quinlan
Waxman and the Frasca team


 

It was the chef's fish courses that really blew me away. (Maybe it was the perfect preparation—Waxman was assisted by Frasca chef Lachlan Mackinnon Patterson (an F&W Best New Chef 2005) and his team—or perhaps it was coming off a meat-centric weekend at the F&W Classic in Aspen). Smoked-trout-and-mascarpone crostini was sweet and smoky, swordfish carpaccio with English pea and herb vinaigrette melted in my mouth and a superlight, tempura-style fritto misto was fantastic. Mackinnon Patterson said it best when he called Waxman “the most soulful chef” he’s cooked with.

Recipes

A Cookbook from Italy’s Most Dreamy Resort

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apple tart

© Jen Murphy
Apple tart at Castello di Vicarello

Earlier in the year I had a chance to spend a weekend cooking with the amazing Aurora Baccheschi Berti at her dreamy 12th-century castle-turned-hotel, Castello di Vicarello, in Maremma, Tuscany. Staying at Vicarello is like staying at fabulous friend’s home with nonstop food, wine and adventure (Aurora’s husband, Carlo, takes groups wild-boar hunting at his nearby lodge, Valle di Buriano. Aurora and Carlo spent years in the textile business and have quite an eye for design. The seven rooms and villas of Vicarello are outfitted with unique antiques, old issues of Art Forum, oversize bathtubs and quirky touches like a zebra-skin rug. But it’s the kitchen that’s truly the heart of the house, and that’s where guests gravitate. Carlo and Aurora, and often their three charming sons, are the perfect hosts, offering up glasses of Brunello and slices of wild-boar prosciutto. Aurora hosts impromptu cooking lessons, and dinners are a two-hour-plus affair. I got a taste of the Tuscan winter on my visit, but Aurora’s just-released cookbook, Tuscany My Way, gives me a chance to recreate recipes from all four seasons at Vicarello. Inspired by the castle’s gardens, the book has more than 100 recipes organized by season, like carbonara withfava beans and apple tart. It’s one of the most transporting cookbooks I’ve seen and the next best thing to a trip back to Tuscany.
 

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