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Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

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Wine Wednesday

Spooky Halloween Wines

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Grilled Beef Ribs with Smoky-Sweet Barbecue Sauce // © John Kernick

Pair chef David Burtka's frighteningly human-like beef back ribs with one of these spooky Halloween wines. / © John Kernick

Here’s the way I see it with Halloween wines. There are plenty of wines out there that are propelled by some sort of marketing gimmick—Dracula’s favorite Transylvanian Zinfandel, 2012 Mr. Bones Bug Juice, what have you—but there are also some wines that more organically have a spooky Halloween vibe to them. Here are a few possibilities that would be appropriate served out of black glasses in a Haunted House, and that also actually taste good. The list of Halloween-ready booze. »

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Editor Obsession

Cheese, Beer and The Fabulous Beekman Boys

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Beekman 1802 Blaak

Justin Chapple

This week, the Beekman Boys (whose fabulous show is moving to the Cooking Channel in September) released their second batch of Beekman 1802 Blaak cheese at a party held at the unrelated Beekman Beer Garden in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport.

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The Week in Food

Technicolor PBR

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Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer. Courtesy of Pabst Brewing Company.

Courtesy of Pabst Brewing Company

The Week in Food looks at noteworthy food or food-related inventions, announcements and other "firsts" throughout history.

The introduction of an interstate highway system in the 1950s made cross-country delivery easier and more economical, allowing companies like breweries, which were mostly local or regional, to expand their consumer base for the first time. With greater sales potential on the horizon, Milwaukee’s Pabst Brewing Company chose to market to a national audience on June 25, 1951 via America's first color TV beer commercial.

"What'll You Have? Pabst Blue Ribbon!" >>>

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Editor Picks

Best July 4th Drinks

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Aperol Spritz

Courtesy of Aperol

 

America’s favorite day for grilling and fireworks is also one of F&W editors’ favorite days for drinking. Icy mint juleps and citrusy Txakoli wine are on their list of what to drink for the Fourth >

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Drink This Now

Best Canned Beer for Summer

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Craft Canned Beers

 

Considered for years to be a déclassé mark of mass production, canned beer is gaining popularity with many craft brewers. Especially handy for summer, cans are not only easier to pack, stack and transport, but they also preserve beer better than bottles. Oskar Blues' Dale Katechis and Sixpoint's Shane Welch swear by canned beers >

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What To Drink Next

Editor Picks: What to Drink on Memorial Day

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Mojito

© Wendell T. Webber / Mojito

Chilled rosés, crisp pilsners and refreshing cocktails are among F&W editors' top picks for outdoor parties over the long weekend >

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Beer

Business Help for DIY Dreamers

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Jim Koch of Sam Adams with brewers from Roc Brewing

Courtesy of Boston Beer

Jim Koch of Samuel Adams knows that starting a food or beverage business is hard.

Here, Koch tells F&W what he's doing to help small businesses>

 

 

 

 

 

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Beer

How to Throw the Ultimate Super Bowl Party

How to Throw the Ultimate Super Bowl Party

F&W's Tina Ujlaki, who happens to be known for her Hall of Fame-worthy Super Bowl parties, reveals her top tips for throwing fantastic, stress-free game-day bashes.

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Beer

Rock-Star Road Food

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Eating their way across America: Bluesy rockers The Stone Foxes.

© Rochelle Mort Photography
Eating their way across America: Bluesy rockers The Stone Foxes.

San Francisco indie rockers The Stone Foxes were in New York recently for the annual CMJ Music Marathon and Film Festival. Haven’t heard them yet? You probably mistook them for the Black Keys in a recent Jack Daniels commercial in which they covered Slim Harpo’s bluesy “I’m a King Bee.” I sat down with the band between shows for a rundown of their favorite eats from their last few months of touring (they’re also documenting the tastiest bites on their Facebook page).


Where's your favorite preshow meal these days?

Aaron Mort, bass: Being a vegan on the road is definitely pretty challenging. Going through the South for a week, iceberg lettuce with barbecue sauce was pretty much all I ate, but The Grit is an amazing vegetarian place in Athens, Georgia. Spence got the Mediterranean platter, and the hummus was insane.

Spence Koehler, lead guitar: The Shed in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, is just a shack on the edge of a swamp with a barbecue pit and picnic tables, but its baby back ribs are some of the best I’ve ever had.

Shannon Koehler, drums: I tried blood sausage for the first time at the Sweet Afton pub in Astoria, New York. It freaked me out, but I had to trust my bartender’s recommendation. It was glorious. Amen.

Elliott Peltzman, keyboards: I tried the vegan “Chik’n Parmigiana” at Foodswings in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and I swear it tasted exactly like a real chicken parm. It even flaked like real chicken when you pulled it apart.

 

What are you washing it all down with?

Spence: I was blown away by the Four Peaks Kilt Lifter Scottish style ale we tried in Phoenix. It’s superstrong but extremely flavorful.

Elliott: We took the locals’ advice and tried Terrapin Brewery in Athens, Georgia. Its IPA is excellent.

Aaron: And of course, the Bay Area has great beer. I love Russian River Brewing Company’s Pliny the Elder.

 

What are you excited to eat when you get back to San Francisco in a few weeks?

Spence: I’m baking pumpkin pies as soon as I get home. That’s number one.

Joe Barham, band manager: I’m stoked for organic Mexican food at Gracias Madre. It’s a block from my house, so I go there I lot.

Aaron: I’m going to break my vegan streak for the boozy Secret Breakfast ice cream at Humphry Slocombe. It tastes like the bourbon pound cake my mom always makes for Christmas.

Beer

Craft Beer in Cans

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It’s very easy to imagine some beer-drinking alien from the planet Xorx arriving on Earth and saying, “Let me get this straight. You have 1,716 independent small brewers in your ‘country’—whatever that is—and until now they never thought of putting their beer in cans? Hmmm. You really are lesser beings, aren’t you. I shall now vaporize your cities.”
 
Thankfully, the craft brewers of America are finally relenting on this bottle-only approach to beer, which (a) will save us all from early vaporization, and (b) will allow people like me to drink their beer at the beach. 

Now it’s possible, even likely, that beer purists will insist that the bottle is theonly way to go, that the complex nuances of a fine beer are made flat and anemic by aluminum. I will insist in turn that coming across Brooklyn’s Six Point Brewery’s terrific Bengal Tiger IPA in cans at my local supermarket is a mighty fine thing indeed.
 
So if you meet a Xorxian (blue, tentacles, loves pale ale), offer him/her/them/whatever a fine craft beer in a can. Unless you want to be known as the dope who got our fair nation wiped from the face of the planet. Here are a few that ought to do the trick.
 
New Belgium Fat Tire Amber Ale. The craft-ale-in-can movement has proved so successful for Fort Collins, Colorado’s New Belgium that it just announced the addition of a 16,000-square-foot canline to its brewery. Fat Tire is malty and on the richer side: a good burger beer.
 
Six Point Craft Ales Bengali Tiger IPA. Sixteen-ounce cans for this one, and why not—it’s a terrific beer (as noted above), balancing its piney hops notes against a fair amount of richness. It’s particularly appealing because Six Point’s ales haven’t been available in either bottles or cans, just on tap or in growlers, until now.
 
Anderson Valley Brewing Company Hop Ottin’ IPA. Classic West Coast India Pale Ale with a zingy dose of citrusy hops. I’m a little sad the Anderson Valley folks retired their Poleeko Gold Pale Ale in cans in favor of this IPA, but it’s still a darn fine brew.
 
Harpoon Summer Beer. This is a kolsch-style beer, which basically means it’s a lighter Germanic ale—an ale that drinks a bit like a lager, if you will. If you were on a boat on a scenic lake with a cold six-pack of these cans and a fishing rod/book/tuna sandwich/whatever makes you happiest, then your life would be an enviable one.
 
Porkslap Pale Ale. That is it about the name Porkslap that says so elegantly, “Buddy, are you kidding me? Of course I'm in a damn can”? Regardless, this lightly gingery ale from New York’s Butternuts brewery was way ahead of the curve—the first release was in 2005. And yes, it is sold only in cans.
 
Related Links: Best American Beer, Bourbon and More
Great Beer Pairings
Cooking with Beer Recipes

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Join celebrity chefs, renowned winemakers and epicurean insiders at the culinary world’s most spectacular weekend, the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.