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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Ragout of Clams with Spinach, Sausage and Orzo

Ragout of Clams with Spinach, Sausage and Orzo

All around the world the pairing of clams and pork, especially cured or seasoned pork of some kind, is a superb match. For this recipe, I use a simple Italian sausage (usually a great one) made with fennel and chile; if your local butcher shop sells a handcrafted one, by all means use that. But if all you have on hand is a supermarket sausage, go for it. The pasta, lemon and thyme remind me of all the great Mediterranean versions of this dish I have had over the years. READ MORE »

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New Slideshow

Andrew Zimmern's Favorite Meatballs, Dim Sum and Macaroons

TV host and F&W contributing editor Andrew Zimmern went on a mission to find America’s best balls of food. “You may think that my favorite balls of food would amount to a list of exotic animal anatomy,” he says, “but I’d much rather eat spherical creations made by the country’s best chefs.” Check out F&W’s new slideshow for Zimmern’s excellent finds including Cochon's fried boudin balls (left) in New Orleans, meatball-shaped sweetbreads created by Jamie Bissonnette of Toro and delicious macaroons at Salty Tart in Minneapolis. Plus, a few “odd bits” for good measure.

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Andrew Zimmern's Kitchen Adventures

Pheasant Confit Salad

Pheasant Confit Salad

In Minnesota we love to hunt and if I have a bad weekend, there are always the endless coveys of relatives and neighbors dropping off birds at the doorstep. I store plenty of the confit birds (covered in their fat) in the fridge and crisp halves or quarters as needed, served with salads, on root vegetable mash, in tacos with tomatillo salsa or as a hash with fried egg for breakfast (I love that one). Try this salad. It makes a great fall luncheon or Sunday dinner entrée if you want something easy to throw together. Read more »

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Gratinée des Halles... The Best Onion Soup

Gratinée des Halles

I have cooked French food my whole life. I trained in France, worked there and have as much experience in that style as any other, if not more. In 1992, I started work at a French bistro in Minneapolis that for the longest time served the best onion soup I ever tasted. Here is that recipe. It's redesigned for the home cook in only one way: the stock. In the restaurant we were able to make a 72-hour veal stock that provided a backbone like no other for this French classic. If you want to be super-ambitious and love the crafty part of cookery, go for it and make your own. If you have access to a butcher shop or specialty market that sells frozen homemade stock (beef or veal) the recipe below works superbly. If you are using stock from a box, it won't have the flavor, texture or collagen/gelatin needed to make this soup a home run. That being said, I have made it with Swanson chicken stock on a hunting trip and it's still pretty darn tasty. SEE RECIPE »

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Spanish-Style Baked Stuffed Clams

Spanish-Style Baked Stuffed Clams

This is one of my favorite clam recipes, the more Spanish version of clams casino. I think of it as the most likely progenitor of that steak house and country club classic. I never heard of this as a Spanish dish until I started reading Penelope Casas's books when I got out of college. Anyone looking for some lusty, good old-school Spanish food should read her books. Anyway, I have made this dish for a long time, with much success. When poaching the clams I use a half bottle of a light, crisp white wine with some diced celery, carrot and onion. I bring it to a boil before loading in the cleaned and scrubbed clams. Pluck them out as soon as they open or you risk toughening the little beauties. Strain the broth and use it for soups and stews; it's fantastically oceanic and sweet-salty. SEE RECIPE »

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Apple-Raisin Crumb Cake

Apple-Raisin Crumb Cake

This foolproof crumb cake is so easy to make that my eight year old has better success with it than I do. I think it's because he follows directions better than me. I use a great streusel topping, because I am obsessed with streusel and it tastes so great on this cake. We make this all through apple season, but make sure you use apples suitable for cooking and baking. Many types of apples (McIntosh, for example) will just fall apart when cooked. You don't want that. Trust me. SEE RECIPE »

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Rigatoni with Veal Bolognese and Butternut Squash

Rigatoni with Veal Bolognese and Butternut Squash

I have been keeping recipes in a folder my whole life. At first they were handwritten; then in my professional days I kept them in a set of notebooks; and now, in the digital age, they are on my laptop. I have been pretty obsessive about this for about 40 years now. I wish I knew where I first got the recipe for this insanely cool veal and squash Bolognese. I do know I fell in love with this delicious combination on a trip to Bergamo, the hilltop city in Lombardy, just north of Milan. I was with my father on my first visit to Italy in 1974, and one night we stumbled into a small little trattoria after driving a considerable way south from Switzerland and we just couldn't keep going on to Milan without dinner. I had squash ravioli with a meaty, sage-spiked, creamy veal sauce that night as a pasta course. The combination of flavors, an Italian classic, began to sneak its way into Italian restaurants in the late '70s in New York. I remember a squash and veal risotto at La Colonna in the early 1980s that blew my mind, and by the late '80s I saw plenty of dishes pairing noodles and veal and squash. I love this one above all, which is low on tomato, providing just enough for acidic balance. I can't imagine this won't become an instant favorite for you. And yes, it freezes beautifully and makes enough sauce for four or five generous portions of pasta (1 pound dried before cooking). SEE RECIPE »

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Grilled Radicchio with Goat Cheese and Herbed Tomato Dressing

Grilled Radicchio with Goat Cheese and Herbed Tomato Dressing

This end-of-summer salad takes care of the biggest problem in my kitchen as August turns to September: what to do with all of my tomatoes. I serve lamb chops or grilled chicken right on top of this all the time so the elements here are all multipurpose. I often use the grilled lettuce technique elsewhere, and the tomato vinaigrette is perfect with shellfish or as a kind of sauce for just about anything that benefits from the bright acidity. The trio of grilled radicchio (I prefer the long-leaf varietal for this recipe), goat cheese and tomato is about as essential as it gets, focusing heavily on sour-salty-bitter-sweet. The first time I saw this dish was during a press tour, I am guessing about 25 years ago, by Sir Terence Conran in support of one of his books or stores. I was part of the team in New York City, making the food for a massive dinner celebrating his incredible influence on the culinary world and I was assigned to prepare one of his chefs to make this dish as a small course. I have been cooking it ever since. Paired with crusty bread it stands on its own, thanks to the cheese pairing, but it's also killer with something off the grill as part of a meal. SEE RECIPE »

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Chicken Nation

Andrew Zimmern's Global Chicken Guide

Andrew Zimmern's Global Chicken Guide

The TV star and F&W contributing editor shares the best places around the world to try every single part of the chicken—from the head to the feet.

HEARTS
Bird Land, Tokyo
Chef Toshihiro Wada's Bird Land tops my list for yakitori in Tokyo. Every part of the bird is served here, including the heart, a lean, tender organ that only takes a minute to cook over the superhot binchotan charcoal. Most people think of offal as too funky, but the heart is a great introduction to the odd bits: It's slightly chewy and takes on a nice char. ginza-birdland.sakura.ne.jp.

HEADS + NECKS
Va Villa, Mexico City
At this stall in the Barrio Tepito district, heads and necks are fried in lard and then swaddled in salsa verde, queso blanco, shredded lettuce and diced tomatoes. Laid on top of crispy fried tortillas, they almost look like little chicks sleeping. Fray Bartolome de las Casas (West Of Aztecas), Barrio Tepito.

BUTTS (POPE'S NOSES)
Shilin Night Market; Taipei, Taiwan
Walking through this market, you will bump into vendors grilling skewers of unusual chicken parts: unlaid eggs, feet and chicken butts, the flappy bit at the end of the animal where a huge nugget of fat holds the massive plume of feathers. Try any vendor; grilled hard, these chewy nuggets become a crispy, delicious bite and are my single favorite part of the chicken. Jihe Rd, Shilin District.

LIVER
Chez Georges, Paris

My grandmother's chopped chicken liver has no equal, but Chez Georges's chicken liver terrine is close. Smooth, rich, fatty, minerally and dense, it has all the qualities I love in liver. Get extra bread. 1 Rue du Mail; 33-1-42-60-07-11.

WINGS
New Lane; Penang, Malaysia

New Lane is the greatest street-food stroll in the world, partly because it's the only place to get these chicken wings—glazed with a sticky sauce of sugar, soy, rice wine, cinnamon and star anise. Look for a stall with the longest line of locals. Lorong Baru, Georgetown.

KEEL BONES
Kokekokko, Los Angeles
The chefs at Little Tokyo's Kokekokko have yakitori down to a science. They also nail the art. Try skewers of non-traditional parts, like keel bones, the rubbery wedge between the chicken breasts. It has great smoky flavor and the perfect crunchy, yielding feel. 203 S. Central Ave.; 213-687-0690.

THIGHS
Bukhara, New Delhi
One of the best restaurants in India, Bukhara serves richly seasoned, tandoor-cooked red-gold chicken thighs that are buttery, spicy and crisp in all the right places. Diplomatic Enclave, Sardar Patel Margs; 91-11-26112233.

BREASTS
Willie Mae's Scotch House, New Orleans
Located in the Treme neighborhood, the restaurant is run by Willie Mae's granddaughter, who serves some of the best fried chicken. It's the only place where I ever order breasts, because frankly, it's one of the few spots that knows how to cook them. 2401 Saint Ann St.; 504-822-9503.

SKIN
Husk; Charleston, SC
Southern chefs aren't afraid of fat, so it makes sense that chicken skin shows up in a few different incarnations at Sean Brock's Husk (as a salad garnish or with pimento cheese). The absolute best use of the skin, however, is as an appetizer, where it's buttermilk-marinated and deep-fried. huskrestaurant.com

LEGS
Scotchies Restaurant; St. Ann, Jamaica
The chicken is bathed in a flaming-hot seasoning of Scotch bonnet peppers and spices. After a day in the rub, the birds are smoke-roasted on stacks of pimento wood. I ask for piles of legs and a coconut water. N. Coast Hwy., Drax Hall.

FEET
M. Wells Dinette; Long Island City, NY
Inside the Museum of Modern Art's PS 1 outpost, this spot is renowned for Hugue Dufour's fat-on-fat Quebecois food. I always order the crispy and chewy buffalo-style chicken feet—drenched in hot sauce and, of course, maple syrup. momaps1.org

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Soba Noodles with DIY Shrimp Tempura

Zaru Soba

Eating noodles is a regular part of my kitchen life, and not just pasta. Japanese noodle dishes, especially soba noodles, are one of my favorite treats. I love eating cool and refreshing zaru soba in the warm weather months, and I have included my favorite hot noodle recipe as well. Making them requires having a few pantry items like dashi, (bonito fish and kombu—seaweed—stock) on hand. Any of the specialty items can be obtained at your local Asian market. SEE RECIPE »

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Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Run with chefs and wine experts in the Celebrity Chef 5K and dance all night at Gail Simmons’ Last Bite Dessert Party during the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.