My F&W
quick save (...)

Mouthing Off

By the Editors of Food & Wine Magazine

RSS
Trendspotting

Hawaiian Food Hits the Mainland

Hawaiian Food

Homesick transplants and other Spamophiles are transforming food across America, even adding island flavors to classics like burgers and eggs Benedict.

read more
Kickstart It

Chocolates with Your Face on Them

With four days to go, piq chocolates needs less than $500 to successfully fund a $25,000 Kickstarter campaign to make custom chocolates. If you've always wanted to be immortalized in chocolate, they can do it. The Austin-based company lets customers design squares, bars and small 3D chocolates online and then produces them for delivery around the country. They plan to get chocolates to backers by mid-December so this is a chance to create a holiday card that no one would ever toss. Because they can eat it!

Related: Coolest Crowdfunded Food Projects

American Flavor

Ames Farm Honey's Single-Minded Beekeeper

Ames Farm Honey

If you gave Brian Fredericksen a spoonful of one of his varietal honeys, he could tell you what kind of flowers the bees were pollinating when they produced it, in what season and in what kind of weather. To most people, it would just taste delicious—as different from squeeze-bottle honey as an heirloom tomato in August is from a supermarket one in January. Read more >

read more
American Flavor

Jean & Kate Granola: From Bog to Brooklyn

Jean & Kate Granola

In 2011, Jean Devine and Kate Suhr, who met volunteering for a New York City nonprofit, began hosting monthly supper clubs at Devine's apartment in Brooklyn. One night, the menu included butternut squash bisque, mushrooms stuffed with brioche and root-vegetable pot pie, everything served on rustic clay dishes that Devine had made herself. But what the guests were still talking about weeks later was the parting gift—a little bag of homemade granola, from a recipe Suhr liked to tinker with in pursuit of breakfast perfection. Read more >

read more
American Flavor

Jacobsen Salt Co.: Small-Batch Brininess

Jacobsen Salt Co.

The country's most talented artisans are turning out better versions of kitchen basics like granola, honey and sea salt.

Ben Jacobsen discovered great salt when he traveled abroad after college, buying it everywhere from Denmark to South Africa. "It transformed everything I put it on," he says. In 2009, a couple years after returning home to Oregon, he set out to make his own salt: "I figured that if Maldon comes from the UK, which has a similar climate to the Pacific Northwest, this had to be possible."

Jacobsen spent the next two-and-a-half years testing seawater in dozens of spots. "The taste and salinity of the salt varied incredibly," he says. "It was the same way that terroir affects wine." He finally settled on Netarts Bay, 80 miles west of Portland, hand-pumping seawater into plastic drums that he would transport to a commercial kitchen in the city, then painstakingly collecting flakes of salt by hand with a custom-made strainer.

Within a couple of years, Jacobsen had gone from producing three pounds of salt a week to 300, and his customer list had grown to include big-name chefs like Chris Cosentino, Thomas Keller and Paul Kahan. Recently, Jacobsen Salt Co. moved its seven employees into a 3,500-square-foot workspace on the Oregon coast. But its owner has no plans to alter his low-tech production methods. "The quality has to be there," he says. "That's why we're here." $3.50 for 0.2 oz; jacobsensalt.com

Related: Small-Batch Superstars
Lessons from Salt Guru Mark Bitterman
Great American Artisans

advertisement
The Dish
Receive delicious recipes and smart wine advice 4x per week in this e-newsletter.
The Wine List Weekly pairing plus best bottles to buy.
F&W Daily One sensational dish served fresh every day.
advertisement

Tune in on Wednesdays at 10PM ET for Top Chef: Boston, the 12th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.