8 Fantastic and 5 Not-So-Great Things About Dating a Chef

Best New Chefs 2014 Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton © William Hereford
By Justine Sterling Posted February 12, 2015

As is the case with most things, there are good and bad aspects of falling in love with a chef—especially if you’re also working in a kitchen. Here, chefs reveal the best and worst things about dating another chef.

As is the case with most things, there are good and bad aspects of falling in love with a chef—especially if you’re also working in a kitchen. Here, chefs reveal the best and worst things about dating another chef.

The Good

“Food is always the focus of a fun outing.” —Cortney Burns, Bar Tartine in San Francisco

“Chefs understand the heavy work schedule. And after spending years in kitchens, you’re bound to appreciate each other’s sense of humor. Also, when you cook at home, when you aren’t too tired, some really fantastic meals come together that can be very inspiring.” —Greg Denton, Ox in Portland, OR

“It’s always fun to share a mutual obsession with someone. And we eat so well! Even when we eat junk food, it’s junk food done right.” —Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton, Ox in Portland, OR

“Being on the same page about what is in the fridge. Even now that we [she and her husband, chef Stuart Brioza] have a 4-year-old, we still pretty much have the same things in the fridge that we did before: cheese, something pickled, tortillas and mayo. All good for after-work snacking—and, funnily enough, kids’ lunches.” —Nicole Krasinski, State Bird Provisions in San Francisco

“I don’t always have to cook.” —Matt Danzer, Uncle Boons in New York City

“Having someone to endlessly talk about food and restaurants with and obsess over trivial kitchen things. That probably wouldn’t go over as well with someone not in the industry.” —Ann Redding, Uncle Boons in New York City

“Loving the fact that you have a Monday off when the rest of the world doesn’t.” —Evan Rich, Rich Table in San Francisco

“The fact that we both understand what it means to commit to this business—the time, energy and sacrifice. And having someone to talk through ideas with and be inspired by.” —Sarah Rich, Rich Table in San Francisco

The Bad

“Sometimes there can be a little too much alpha in the kitchen. It can be hard to take a step back and let the other person’s culinary vision lead at times, and it’s possible to feel like even when it’s just the two of us there are too many cooks in the kitchen.” —Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton, Ox in Portland, OR

“You rarely get time outside of the restaurant together.” —Cortney Burns, Bar Tartine in San Francisco

“You’re always talking about food, restaurants and work.” —Ann Redding, Uncle Boons in New York City

“The conversation is almost always about the restaurant—and we eat too much.” —Evan Rich, Rich Table in San Francisco

“We have very little time for just the two of us together because of our work schedules.” —Sarah Rich, Rich Table in San Francisco

Related: 16 Great Recipes for 2
20 Romantic Valentine's Day Recipes
5 Chef Couples Share the Dishes That Made Them Fall in Love

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