5 Artisanal Matzos for Passover

© Antonis Achilleos
By Justine Sterling Posted April 01, 2015

Passover begins this Friday—have you stocked up on matzo yet? Whether you celebrate the holiday or simply like to snack on this pleasantly crispy, large-format cracker, you can upgrade your matzo experience by thinking outside the Manischewitz box. Make your own at home using these simple step-by-step instructions, or try one of these delicious artisanal versions.

Passover begins this Friday—have you stocked up on matzo yet? Whether you celebrate the holiday or simply like to snack on this pleasantly crispy, large-format cracker, you can upgrade your matzo experience by thinking outside the Manischewitz box. Make your own at home using these simple step-by-step instructions, or try one of these delicious artisanal versions.

Eli Zabar’s Sourdough Matzo
New York City’s mini empire of markets and bakeries from baker Eli Zabar sells handmade matzo. The extra-crispy matzo is lightly tart thanks to a sourdough base. 

Daniel Boulud’s Craft Matzo
Former Boulud group boulanger Mark Fiorentino learned the art of matzo making from Streit’s, an old-school NYC kosher food producer, about 10 years ago and passed the knowledge on to François Brunet, the current boulanger, when he left the group last year. The simple but flavorful wafers are available at all of Boulud’s restaurants, as well as Épicerie Boulud, his oyster bar and market.

Bobolink’s Ancient Wheat Matzo
Bobolink, a New Jersey dairy farm and bakery, sells its round, rustic matzo at greenmarkets around New York City and ships it to homes across the country. The hearty matzo are made with just water and emmer wheat—a sweet, rich ancient grain—and baked in the wood-fired oven.

Naga Bakehouse’s Locavore Matzo
Made with a blend of locally grown Vermont wheat and emmer, Naga’s “Vermatzah” is baked in a wood-fired oven in small batches. Each box of Vermatzah comes with Vermont wheat berries so customers can plant their own crop.

Silvermoon Bakery’s Italian-Style Matzo
Harpsichordist-turned-baker Judith Norell makes lacy, Italian-style matzo at her NYC bakery. Made with a touch of olive oil and salt in the dough, the flavorful crisps are available plain, whole wheat or dusted with sesame seeds. Unfortunately, Vermatzah is no longer available this season, but you can already pre-order a batch for next year’s Seder.

Related: 15 Fantastic Recipes for Passover
10 Modern Passover Recipes
9 Great Desserts for Passover

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