The brunch staple goes best with the world’s most versatile pairing wines: sparklers, Rieslings and rosés.

Kristin Donnelly
May 10, 2015

The brunch staple goes best with the world’s most versatile pairing wines: sparklers, Rieslings and rosés.

Sparkling wine. Bubbly wines are ideal for brunch—and not just because of the low alcohol levels. The wines’ bright acid and bubbles scrub your palate in between bites of rich eggs and buttery hollandaise sauce. If you want to splurge, serve Blanc de Blancs Champagne, which is made from Chardonnay. For something less expensive, try sparkling wine from Alsace, known as Crémant d’Alsace.

Slightly sweet German Riesling. The match-up of salty and sweet flavors is behind many of the world’s great pairings. Think French fries and ketchup or soda and pizza. That’s why slightly off-dry Riesling is so delicious with cured meats, like ham and Canadian bacon along with, of course, some hollandaise. Look for Rieslings that say “feinherb” on the label, which tend to have a whisper of sweetness along with plenty of citrusy acidity.

Rosé. Pink wines are versatile and they make great brunch wines. While rosés pair nicely with your standard eggs Benedict, they’re especially good when other ingredients are added to the mix, like shellfish (lobster, crab or shrimp, especially) or tomatoes or olives. Look for pale pink, lighter-style roses with plenty of berry fruit and mouthwatering acidity, such as those from southern France.

Kristin Donnelly is a former Food & Wine editor and author of the forthcoming The Modern Potluck (Clarkson Potter, 2016). She is also the cofounder of Stewart & Claire, an all-natural line of lip balms made in Brooklyn.

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