Breweries

Brewing started out as a cottage industry, with production taking place at home. But by the ninth century farms and monasteries began to produce beer on a larger, commercial scale. Today breweries vary greatly in size and production capacity—brewpubs function as pubs or restaurants and make their own beer to sell to customers, while major brewing companies like Anheuser-Busch can employ as many as 150,000 people. Conversely, microbreweries produce small amounts of beer and are usually independently owned. Check out our guide to breweries to find a nanobrewery in your state or to learn where to buy monk-brewed Trappist ale.

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Food & Wine: A New England Brewery Road Trip
A New England Brewery Road Trip
New England is ideal for so much more than leaf peeping this time of year. It is home to some of the best beer in America. As a style, the hazy New England IPAs born out of the region have exploded and there is fine barrel-aged work being done up and down the East Coast. But unless you have an extra couple week’s of vacation, it’s nearly impossible to get to every worthwhile stop in New England, especially when breweries like the Alchemist and Hill Farmstead are up in the hinterlands of Vermont near the Canadian border. Here, an easier beer trail—a brewery road trip you can make on a long weekend that’s mostly one easy shot up highway 95 with just a couple brief detours.

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