Mixologists are all stirred up about the plethora of new rum imports. Here, three places to drink now and five bottles to buy.

Rum Basics: Light to Full Rums

Consultant and importer Edward Hamilton of Ministry of Rum describes different rum styles from various islands; F&W names bottles to match.



Zaya. Photo © Hector Sanchez.

Puerto Rico
The island is known for some of the lightest rums. Try The smooth, aged DonQ Gran Añejo rum, made for sipping. $60;

Producers make light- and medium-bodied rums. Try Vanilla-scented Zaya, distilled from black-strap molasses. $30;


Plantation rum grande reserve barbados 5-year-old.

Plantation Rum. Photo © Hector Sanchez.

Aged rums are especially popular here. Try Plantation Rum's Grande Reserve Barbados, aged five years in old cognac barrels. $22;

The specialty is rhum agricole, made with sugar-cane juice rather than molasses. Try Duquesne Élevé Sous Bois. $30;


Smith & Cross Rum.

Smith & Cross. Photo © Haus Alpenz.

Jamaican rums tend to have the fullest flavor. Try Smith & Cross's super-strength bottling, a revived historic recipe. $34;

Excellent New Rum Bars

Smuggler's Cove in San Francisco.

Courtesy of Smuggler's Cove

Smuggler's Cove, San Francisco

Rum fanatic Martin Cate's pirate-perfect bar offers 200 rums to members of its Rumbustion Society. Cate also uses the spirit in terrific cocktails like his Agricole-Guava Cooler.

Cana Rum Bar in LA.

Courtesy of Cana Rum Bar

Caña Rum Bar, Los Angeles

This tony Cuban-style spot charges first-time visitors $20, then donates the fees to a different charity every month. Try one of the three classic daiquiris.

Manhattan's latest speakeasy serves communal bowls filled with 24 varieties of rum punch

© Noah Fecks

Cienfuegos, New York City

Manhattan's latest speakeasy serves communal bowls filled with 24 varieties of rum punch, like the Rosa Verde with pink peppercorns and watermelon.

Great Recipes:

PUBLISHED August 2010