You can make good barbecue on a grill, but using a smoker—which has a separate fire box to keep the heat low and indirect—is easier and better. Here are some of Adam Perry Lang’s favorite models.

Christina Wang
April 01, 2005

You can make good barbecue on a grill, but using a smoker—which has a separate fire box to keep the heat low and indirect—is easier and better. Here are some of Adam Perry Lang’s favorite models.

Pitts and Spitts

These top-of-the-line smokers are often used at barbecue competitions; a built-in water reservoir keeps meat moist (from $1,100; 800-521-2947 or pittsandspitts.com).

Traeger

The enameled-steel “Lil’ Tex” resembles a gas grill but has a motor that slowly feeds the fire with hardwood pellets ($700; 800-872-3437 or traegerindustries.com).

Weber

The capsule-shaped “Smokey Mountain” is big enough to barbecue a turkey and a ham simultaneously ($230; 800-446-1071 or weber.com).

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