My F&W
quick save (...)
When I was a girl, my Sicilian grandmother cooked up dishes I never saw at my friends' houses: stuffed artichokes, fried cardoons, garlicky sautéed escarole and dandelions every which way, in soup, salad, pasta, even liqueur. Now I realize that my family history is tied up with another family, a botanical one--my grandmother's favorite vegetables are all members of the Compositae. The commonly eaten Compositae--including all the let- tuces, endive, chicory, radicchio, tarragon, Jerusalem artichokes, black salsify (scorzonera) and burdock--share one family trait: when cut or peeled and exposed to air, they turn brown quickly. (To avoid oxidation, rub cut or peeled artichokes, cardoons and Jerusalem artichokes with a lemon half or put them in water to which a bit of lemon juice or vinegar has been added; peel burdock and black salsify under running water, then transfer them to acidulated water.) Here are seven recipes, inspired by my grandmother's, for getting to know the Compositae.
Published March 1998
YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Comments

Add A Comment

    Add a Comment

    See our terms
    You must be logged in to comment. or
    advertisement
    The Dish
    Receive delicious recipes and smart wine advice 4x per week in this e-newsletter.
    The Wine List Weekly pairing plus best bottles to buy.
    F&W Daily One sensational dish served fresh every day.
    advertisement

    Tune in on Wednesdays at 10PM ET for Top Chef: Boston, the 12th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

    Already looking forward to next year (June 19-21, 2015)? Relive your favorite moments from the culinary world's most sensational weekend in the Rocky Mountains.